Learn how to travel off the beaten path with the monthly HoliDaze insider guide  



Travelling solo can always be a challenge and a daunting experience. The sense of nervousness can be heightened when you are a female travelling going solo. While the world is a beautiful place, it can also be scary and you shouldn’t take security lightly as a female traveller.

Nonetheless, when the travel bug bites you need to answer to its call and you don’t need to be too afraid of travelling around the world as a girl. Here are some of the destinations you should keep in mind when looking for places to go.

Reykjavik, Iceland

If you want to see gender equality in action, then you should consider flying out to Iceland. The country has had its fair share of kick-ass women and you can be expected to meet plenty of great people in the Land of Fire and Ice. The natural beauty of this country is just breath-taking, but there are plenty of other things going for the country too. Reykjavik has quite a good nightlife and the culture on display is vibrant and fun. We also like the Icelandic food – don’t worry, it isn’t all about fish either!

Barcelona, Spain

Skyline view of Barcelona, Spain, one of the best destinations for solo female travelers

While Barcelona is a vibrant and big city, which means you need to be careful when travelling alone, it’s such a friendly and welcoming city as well. You simply can’t go through life without experiencing Barcelona. The city has plenty of shopping options from small boutiques to big brands on Las Ramblas. The architecture is stunning; thanks to Gaudi and the Spanish food is just a magnificent experience. The waterfront restaurants offer some fantastic paella, which you can enjoy while taking in the vibrancy of the city.

Dubrovnik, Croatia

You should get in on the latest tourist trends and find yourself in the beautiful coastal city of Dubrovnik. Croatia is a country with a low crime rate and the tourism industry is continuously developing, adding more excitement and opportunities for you to enjoy. The medieval city has plenty of amazing artisan shops to explore, as well as activities to enjoy. For instance, snorkelling is just a fantastic way to take in the crystal clear sea.

Okinawa, Japan

Japan is one of those countries that you just have to experience at some point in your life. While there are cities and town to explore on these magical islands, Okinawa is among the best for a solo traveller. The hustle and bustle is less confusing and chaotic, with the city offering super accessible and safe public transport. The city itself has anything from sandy beach to a market with stunning solo dining opportunities.

Seattle, the USA

Pike Place Market in Seattle, Washington, one of the best destinations for solo female travelers
Pike Place Market in Seattle via michaelrighi

Solo travel can sometimes seem extra costly, but Seattle is a town that has understood the value of solo travellers. Therefore, you can find plenty of places in the city that offer special deals and entertainment for solo backpackers. There are plenty of exciting things to see aside from the fine dining and going out. You have the Space Needle, the EMP Museum and the Pike Place Market with its fantastic offerings.

Taipei, Taiwan

For technology-lovers Taiwan offers plenty to see. Taipei is a slightly less consuming and overwhelming city to some of its major Asian counterparts and therefore a great destination for a female solo traveller. The city even has a Safe Waiting Zone system on the metro platforms, making travel feel a bit less daunting. The city offers plenty of shopping opportunities, not to mention the amazing cuisine you can explore from street food to fine dining.

Washington D.C., the USA

Another great solo destination for women is Washington D.C. The place of political power has the right amount of iconic and historic buildings and places to explore, as well as modern establishments to visit. The city has a funky atmosphere to it that on its own is worth checking out. The public transport works well and finding a safe cab is never an issue in this welcoming city.

London, England

London, England is one of the best destinations for solo female travelers
London was one of the 14 most popular destinations in 2015

Finally, you could explore the charm of the British capital city. The age-old city should keep female travellers on their toes, but when you know where to be and when, you can explore some amazing things around the city. London offers culture and entertainment. If you utilize sites like Attractiontix.co.uk, you can get the best deals and options without breaking the bank. You must eat out at the 1,000 Borough Market and if you snack yourself through smartly, you won’t even spend a penny for the feast. You also must check out the pub life, which can guarantee you won’t need to sit in a corner all alone.

When you travel alone as a woman, you do need to be smart at where you stay and when you explore the venues around you. But if you keep a cold head and plan your actions in advance, you can explore the world and have fun while doing it. Hopefully, the above destinations will inspire you and help you get over the fear of travelling solo.

Published in Travel Tips

This coastal metropolis is India’s Gotham City. Home to more than fifteen million people, Mumbai shows extremes of both debauchery and deprivation. Do not be surprised to find a custom-made Jaguar navigating its way through a street saturated with bicycles, foot-traffic and a variety of animals. The disparity of the city is as striking as it is omnipresent.

Formerly known as Bombay, the city was rechristened with its original moniker of Mumbai, derived from the Hindu goddess Mumba Devi, a few years ago. Mumbai has a lot to offer for the eager traveler. The city is full of ancient temples and places of worship for all religions from Judaism to Zoroastrianism. It boasts of striking colonial era architecture, scenic locales, walkways, parks, as well as a wide assortment of malls, bars and pubs.

But one of the first questions usually asked by anyone travelling to Mumbai is how safe the city really is? The city thrives on chaos; like in all metros in India, Mumbai has a vast migrant population often blamed for the ills of the city. The recent spate of rape cases in the country has once again shifted the spotlight on the safety the city offers to travelers. But contrary to most opinions, Mumbai is one of the safest cities for solo female travelers in India.

Thousands of tourists visit the city each year, on business or for pleasure. There are always certain precautions you need to take when travelling to a foreign country. With Mumbai though, these precautions become a little more specific.

Research the City   India can be a sensory overload to a novice traveler. Much unlike other countries India is diverse, ancient and exists in a precarious balance of traditional values and modern understanding. Knowing as much as you can about the culture, traditions and values espoused by the people of the cities you are visiting will hold you in good stead.

There will be places that you will visit, like the Leopold pub and café, made famous by Gregory David Roberts’ seminal novel on Mumbai, Shantaram, which will feel much the same like any pub back home. But a few hundred meters away you will find yourself in dense lanes, packed with people and wares from wall to wall.

Finding out which area the hotel you will be living in is situated will help you get a better idea of measures you need to take. Check out important numbers like police stations, ambulance services and hospitals close to your place of stay or locations you want to visit.

Understanding the city will take time, coming to terms with the disparity it presents, even more so. Doing your research before you land is the best weapon you have against getting any more culture shocks than necessary.

Play It Safe   India is currently on the cusp of a massive change. Centuries old traditional values exist here alongside modern understanding and the latest technology and often find it hard to maintain a balance. This is not a run-of-the-mill tourist destination; you can’t do here what you will do in, say, Italy.

For example, kissing your wife or companion on the street in Bombay may not only earn you a lot of uncomfortable stares but also a reprimand by the police for indecent behavior in public. Avoid wearing revealing clothes and being overfriendly with unknown men. Your nicety might be interpreted as a come on. Something as simple as walking into a temple with your footwear on, or stepping into a mosque without your head covered can get you into trouble.

Mumbai is the safest city in India for solo female travelers

Project Confidence   Many people travelling to India, specifically to Mumbai, have said that projecting a certain amount of confidence in your dealings with the locals will help avoid you getting taken advantage of. Walk briskly and know exactly where you want to go.

Do not indulge beggars or street urchins; ignoring them, while seeming heartless, is the best way to protect yourself against losing your purse or getting groped. This is one of the most basic tips of travelling to Mumbai. Being polite does not work in this city, it requires a firm hand and a confident demeanor to ensure you are left alone.

Learn the Language   Hindi is the national language of India and is spoken widely in Mumbai. Marathi, on the other hand, is the language that is predominantly spoken by the locals. Getting a handle on some useful local phrases in Hindi and, if you can manage it, in Marathi also, is a good idea.

For example, “chalo” means let’s go, “ruko” means stop and “nahi” means no in Hindi. Understanding and learning these few phrases will not only earn you the respect of the locals but also make your task of navigating through the city much easier.

Plan Your Transportation Carefully   It is never a good idea to be stranded on the streets of a strange city without transportation, especially a strange city in India. Taxis ply through the streets at all hours of the day. The night-time charges though can be steeper than the morning rates, roughly one and a half times more.

Auto-rickshaws, the yellow and green two-stroke wonder of the Indian transport system, are also available at all hours of the day. The thing to take care with autos and taxis is the meter reading; always pay according to the meter regardless of what the driver says. Local trains are one of the biggest means of public transport in the city, followed closely by buses, but are a hotbed for “accidental” touching and theft. There are women special trains and coaches, which you can use for travelling cheaply and safely.

If you are leaving a bar or a restaurant late at night, have someone accompany you to a taxi or an auto-rickshaw. Arriving in the middle of the night can pose more problems; if your flight lands at night make sure you have a pick-up arranged from the hotel you have reserved. Keep your friends and family informed of where you are through the phone or social media. Staying connected will help you ensure that someone is always informed of your whereabouts.

Beware of Pickpockets   Pickpockets are a perpetual nuisance in the crowded streets and public transport systems of this city. Avoid travelling with a lot of cash, and always be careful with your purses and wallets. Keeping your wallet in your front pocket is a good idea. If you have a back pack do not sling it over your back, instead wear it in front where you can see it.

Mumbai is a melting pot of a multitude of cultures, values and modern day thinking. One of the biggest cities in the world it is a much loved tourist destination and has a lot to offer a traveler. But as is the case with traveling to any country, follow the old adage of “when in Rome do as the Romans do.” This will not only ensure you stay safe, but also show you a perspective of the city you may not see otherwise.

  flickr   //   tataimitra   skyevidur

Published in India

So you've decided to hit the road, by yourself – talk about being adventurous and brave!! Congrats! :) Whether this is something daunting or just a walk in the park for you, here are a few thoughts I'd like to share with you...

  1. Have a meal by yourself in a restaurant (before leaving home) – This might not be a big deal to some, however, I've met a couple of women who refuse to sit down in a restaurant and eat alone. Personally, I still have days where it gets difficult to be the only person in the whole restaurant eating by myself – especially during an extended journey and homesickness is setting in. I would look around and every other table is either occupied by a lovey-dovey couple, a group of friends or a family. You will meet new friends as you travel (trust me, you will!) who'd share meals with you but there will always be a meal or two where you have to go it alone and room service isn't an option. So this could be an experiment for you. Take yourself to a nice restaurant tonight. Do not check your smartphone every 5 seconds. Do not plug in your headphones. Do not bring a book / magazine / newspaper. Try to enjoy your meal and the atmosphere of the restaurant. Crack a joke with the wait staff. Surprise yourself.

  2. Familiarize yourself with your camera – Especially if you bought yourself a new one for this upcoming trip. I have done it before and will probably do it again in the future – treat myself to a new camera and not have enough time to learn the functions. Aside from learning how to turn the camera on and off, it's nice to know a few more basic functions. For example the Date/Time setting, I have countless photos taken during the day but the date stamp says ‘pm’ – very silly, really. The camera manufacturers are coming out with very user friendly models, however, sometimes it’s more fun to leave the Automatic setting behind and play around with the other shooting modes. If the User Manual isn't too bulky, take it along on that long haul plane ride.

  3. Be able to read a city map and/or a transit system map – unless you are comfortable with wandering endlessly. These days with many people dependent on their cars and navigation systems, it is not surprising that people are not able to orient themselves with a map. That familiar robotic voice might not be there, suggesting you make a left turn in 500m. I'm not suggesting you need to know how to use a compass...well you should if you are going camping or hiking. It just increases your independence and confidence when you can get yourself from point A to point B with minimal assistance. [N.B. The free maps they hand out in Paris do not show many of the little streets/alleys. So pay attention to street names instead of just keeping count how many street you have crossed – personal experience.]

  4. Upload photos of your family and friends onto your phone OR carry the prints with you – You never know when you need to look at a familiar face to comfort you. They are great for those homesick days. They are also great as conversation starters. Many times on my travels, complete strangers who are locals have approached me to start a conversation – sometimes they are simply curious and friendly, sometimes to practice their English. It is fun and it's safe.

  5. Take a walk in a park or down a quiet street at night – Find your comfort level. You are still in your "backyard" so you know the area but a street can feel completely different at night and empty. To minimize the potential shock to your system of being alone, test your boundaries beforehand. Take along a small flashlight or torch (waterproof if possible) on your trip, it will come in handy, especially if your destination is known for brown outs.

Sometimes a little mental preparation can help make your journey a lot more enjoyable. Bon Voyage!

Published in First Time Backpacking

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