Are you a fan of haunted places? Do you have nerves of steel? Well then, this place may be just for you -- if you also do not mind facing legal action in a foreign country. That's right, like with other haunted places this one has no shortage of myths and ghost stories, but unlike other places this one is so haunted the government of India has made it illegal to enter the grounds. I'm dead-serious. Apparently anyone who has been out past sunrise in the ruined town of Bhangarh, also known as Bhangarh Fort, has never returned alive.

The haunted Bhangarh Fort in India is not far from Jaipur

The Bhangarh Fort Warning Sign

Now there is a sign posted warning people away under threat of legal action. However the sign is not posted in front of Bhangarh as you might suspect but rather posted a safe distance away -- on the sacred grounds of a nearby temple.

Translated, The Sign Reads:

The Government of India
The Archeological Survey of India, Bhangarh


Important warning:
1. Entering the borders of Bhangarh before sunrise and after sunset is strictly prohibited.
2. Shepherds and woodcutters who enter Bhangarh area will face legal action.
3. The Kewda or Pandanus trees found in Bhangarh area belong to the Archaeology Survey of India. Is it forbidden to subject this tree to any kind of harm.
Note: Anyone flouting of the rules mentioned above will face legal action.

By order
Supervisor, Archaelogical Survey Board

Bhangarh was established in 1573 (Vikram Samvat calendar year 1631) and at its peak had a population of just over 10,000 inhabitants. But starting with the death of the ruler in 1630 (VS 1688), population began to decline and things just continued downhill from there. The last known inhabitants left in 1783 (VS 1840) supposedly vacated overnight.

As far as what exactly makes Bhangarh Fort so haunted, there are two prevailing myths.

The first legend states that the town of Bhangarh was cursed by the Guru Balu Nath, who only sanctioned its establishment under one condition: "The moment the shadows of your palaces touch me, the city shall be no more!" Years down the line, when a descendant raised the palace to a height that cast a shadow on Balu Nath's forbidden retreat, he cursed the town as prophesied. As a matter-of-fact, Balu Nath is said to lie buried there to this day, ensuring that the curse is never lifted.

The second story involves a former princess of Bhangarh, Princess Ratnavati, who was said to be the shining jewel of all Rajasthan. At that time lived a magician well versed in the occult named Singhia, who was in love with the princess but knew that it could never be as she was above his class. Then one day when Singhia saw the princess in the market, he had an idea. Using his black magic skills, he cursed the oil that Princess Ratnavati was purchasing so that upon touching it to her skin she would surrender herself and run to him. The princess, however, seeing that Singhia was enchanting the oil, foiled his plan by pouring it on the ground. As the oil struck the ground it turned into a giant boulder which crushed Singhia. Dying, the magician cursed the palace with the death of all who dwelt in it.

  Which do you think it is? Share you comments below!

Bhangarh Fort in India, so haunted the government has made it illegal to visit after nightfall!

According to the curse, whichever you may believe, it was also said that if Bhangarh was ever rediscovered, the township itself would not be found, only the temples would show up. True to the story, only the temples of the lost town of Bhangarh dot the landscape and even far up on the mountains only shrines can be seen.

Many locals and visitors alike claim that they have witnessed paranormal activities there, including eery sounds of music and dancing as well weird colored spots in photographs of some of the chambers.

Now I've come across a lot of haunted places, but I have never before seen one that even the government is afraid of. How wild is that! It's that morbid sense of intrigue that earned this place a spot on the ultimate Travel Blogger's Bucket List (TBBL for short).

  India Unexplored: 24 Incredible Offbeat Destinations

What I Want To Know Is:

Why haven't any ghost-investigation shows worked out a deal with the government?

  Other Haunted Sights In India

The Ramoji Film City, in Hyderabad, was built on war grounds of the Nizam sultans. Witnesses report the movie lights suspended up high kept falling down. Light-men who sit with the lights on top have been pushed countless times and many have had grievous injuries. But it doesn't stop there. The food left in cast rooms also gets scattered around the room and strange marks are left on the mirror in an unknown script resembling Urdu, the language spoken by the sultans. Girls are the ghosts' favorite to haunt. They tear at their clothes, knock on the bathroom doors while the outside doors are locked, and in general create mass havoc. Many preventive measures have been taken to prevent hauntings, but none have been of any use.

Sanjay Van, near the Qutab Institutional Area of New Delhi, is a huge forest spread over around 10 kilometers. There is a cremation ground also there, and many people have reported having seen a lady dressed in a white saree appearing and disappearing suddenly.

Vrindavan Society at Thane. It is said a man once committed suicide in one of the Buildings of the Vrindavan Society -- Bldg. No.66 B to be specific. Ever since the security guard's patrolling the area around have come across weird happenings. Once a guard was slapped so hard that he got up from his chair and hit the other guard who was near by him, thinking he was the one who hit him.

Dow-Hill in Kurseong, West Bengal, where the forests are damp and dark, and have an uncanny feeling. People up here tend to be depressed and countless murders have taken place. On the stretch between Dow-Hill road and the Forest Office, woodcutters returning in the evenings have repeatedly sighted a young boy walking head-less for several yards and then walk away from the road into the woods. Other than this, footsteps are heard in the corridors of the Victoria Boys School when the school is closed for long holidays from December to March.

  Visited any of these haunted locations? Know of any others? Share your thoughts!

Published in India

Kumbhalgarh Fort, also known as the Great Wall of India, is a new up-and-coming off the beaten path destination in Rajasthan that is starting to become more well known. However the leap in the numbers of visitors over recent years definitely makes it a worthy destination to visit when in Rajasthan for those who like getting off the tourist trail.

Located near Udaipur, this wonderful fort has a glimpse of history, war and tales of patriotism. If you love to hear history and visualize the fell then this is the must visit for you. The broad and wide walls depict the era of war and conquer, fights and patriotism, and tell the story of how strong the Sisodia dynasty were to safeguard their people.

Kumbhalgarh Fort, one of the historic destinations of royal Rajasthan

How To Get To Kumbhalgarh Fort

Khumbhalgarh can be approached via Udaipur through Dabog airport / Udaipur Junction. But to reach you have to take the road Journey via Nathdwara. It is approximately 90km from Udaipur. The road though is not very good but is a state highway and the government is trying to upgrade so as to increase the travel volume of the state. The road journey is also pleasing as you pass by the country side of the Udaipur district. With it you will get a glimse of true rural India and many beautiful lakes and villages around them. Its good to see the nature and humans mingling with each other.

Kumbhalgarh Great Wall in India, second only to the Great Wall of China, as seen from inside the fort
Kumbhalgarh Great Wall, second only to the Great Wall of China, as seen from inside the fort

The fort of Kumbhalgarh is built on a hilltop and the walls of the fort has a peripheral of 36kms. It is the second largest wall in Asia after the famous Great Wall of China. The fort is said to be the most difficult to be won and had lost only once when the combined forces of Mughal Emperor Akbar, Raja Man Singh of Amber, Raja Udai Singh of Marwar and the Sultan of Gujarat breached the wall due to a shortage of drinking water. The walls as said early are huge and unbreachable and this can be gauged by the their overwhelming thickness -- 15 feet!

Badal Mahal, the palace inside Kumbhalgarh Fort in India
Badal Mahal, the palace inside Kumbhalgarh Fort

The road to Badal Mahal, the palace inside Kumbhalgarh Fort
The road to Badal Mahal

View from Badal Mahal, the palace inside Kumbhalgarh Fort
View from Badal Mahal

Ongoing restoration work at Badal Mahal, the palace inside Kumbhalgarh Fort, India
The road to Badal Mahal

Badal Mahal at Kumbhalgarh Fort, India

Kumbhalgarh has become a favourite destination among many travelers, both domestic and international. Plenty of resorts down the hill from 5-star luxury to budget resorts, even camping sites. We stayed in Club Mahindra Resort and really enjoyed the hospitality of the group. NOT TO MISS the light and sound show organised in the fort which narrates you the entire history of the place from its built to its conquer.

View of Kumbhalgarh state

  Kumbhalgarh is a destination less travelled but if you have time while visiting Rajasthan it is highly recommended that you swing by and experience Kumbhalgarh Fort and the majesty of the Great Wall of India with your own eyes.

See More     Rajasthan Travel Guides     India Archives

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Rajasthan's royal forts, palaces, and havelis have marked itself high on the tourist trail. The luxury of the kings and queens, the princely state and the comforts of the royals have now open to the world. Lots of old forts and palaces are opened to the guest for their comfort stay as well as royal treatment and luxury. Some of the royal ones are listed here with a brief description of what makes them unique and worth visiting.

The famous forts of Rajasthan include:

Badal Mahal at Kumbhalgarh Fort, one of the historic destinations of royal Rajasthan

Kumbhalgarh Fort

  Rajsamand, near Udaipur
  UNESCO World Heritage Site

Built by Rana Kymbha, this fortress has only been conquered once in all of history -- due to shortage of water. It was fighting against the joint forces of Akbar, Raja Man Singh of Amber, Raja Udai Singh of Marwar, and the Sultan of Gujarat. The wall of this fort is the second largest continuous wall in the world (after the Great Wall of China) and stretches around 36km. (That's over 20 miles!)     Kumbhalgarh Fort Photo Gallery

Amer (Amber) Fort in Jaipur, one of the historic destinations of royal Rajasthan

Amber Fort

  Jaipur
  UNESCO World Heritage Site

Also known Amer Fort, this ancient fortress is huge. It was constructed by Raja Man Singh I but the history of this city goes back far past this. Amber was ruled by Meena rulers prior to the Rajputs. The fort is known for its rich culture and art. The best part of it are Sheesh Mahal, Diwan-e-Khas, Diwan-e-Aam, and Sukh Niwas.     More Amber Fort Photos

Jaisalmer Fort, one of the historic destinations of royal Rajasthan
via Milo & Silvia

Chittorgarh Fort

  Chittorgarh, near Udaipur
  UNESCO World Heritage Site

Chittorgarh is the epitome of Chattri Rajput (an Indian Warrior caste) pride, romance and spirit, for people of Chittor always chose death before surrendering against anyone. Vijay Stambh and Rani Padmini's sacrifice in the great and extended fort of Chittorh are the best part. Meera bai, a famous follower or lord Krishna also relates to the history of Chittorgarh.

Jaisalmer Fort, one of the historic destinations of royal Rajasthan

Jaisalmer Fort

  Jaisalmer
  UNESCO World Heritage Site

One of the largest forts in the world, Jaisalmer Fortress was built by the Bhati Rajput ruler Rawal Jaisal, from where both the town and fort derives their names. The fort stands proudly amidst the golden stretches of the great Thar Desert, on a hill overlooking the city around it, and has been the scene of many battles. Its massive yellow sandstone walls are of yellow color during the day, fading to honey-gold as the sun sets. For this reason, it is also known as the "Golden Fort".

The famous palaces and havelis of Rajasthan include:

Hawa Mahal, also known as the Wind Palace, is one of the obligatory sights to visit in Jaipur, the Pink City of India
Hawa Mahal, the Wind Palace located right in the heart of the Pink City, Jaipur -- cannot miss it

Jal Mahal, also known as the Water Palace, is one of the obligatory sights to visit in Jaipur, the Pink City of India
Jal Mahal, the Water Palace also located in Jaipur is another popular destination. There is an open promenade (where this photo was taken from) where locals always gather and enjoy the view -- as do the tourists!

Raj Mahal Palace, also known as Jaisalmer Palace because of its location
Raj Mahal Palace, also known as Jaisalmer Palace for an obvious reason, is another beautiful of ancient architecture that is now a museum. (Jaisalmer may be located far from everything but do not skip it!)

    Others noteable palaces:
  • Lake Palace of Udaipur (now a luxury hotel)
  • City Palace of Udaipur (now converted into a museum)
  • City Palace of Jaipur (now converted into a museum)
  • Umed Bhavan Palace in Jodhpur (now converted into a hotel)
  • Patwa ki Haveli in Jaisalmer -- the Merchants Haveli (now converted into a small museum)

Rajasthan has achieved great importance that has withstood the test of time and now attracts more tourists than invading empries. From a travel point of view its rich and royal forts, palaces, and havelis make Rajasthan a "must visit" destination for most visitors to India. Experience the royal treatment of past kings and queens and walk where they walked, enjoy the same elegant destinations and views. It is truly a step back in time!

See More     Rajasthan Travel Guides     India Archives

Published in India

Even in India, a nation that is flooded with cultural symbolism, history and numerous religious practices, Jaipur stands apart from the others. The city not only reflects the above mentioned practices but also incorporate rich heritage of craft and art.

Nahargarh Fort in Jaipur, India
Nahargarh Fort in Jaipur, India

The Nahargarh Fort, which used to guard the Pink City, now overlooks the growth and prosperity of the modern Jaipur. It has seen various chapters of Jaipur history from its existence to India independence and still today, it silently observes the growth of the city.

View from Nahargarh Fort in Jaipur, India

View from Nahargarh Fort in Jaipur, India

The city of Jaipur, built by Sawai Jai Singh II, was heavily fortified, since the king took a special interest in the security of the area and due to this he began the construction of Nahargarh Fort in the year 1734. The fort is believed to be named after a Mogul Prince and that’s why in certain parts of Nahargarh, the walls are adorned with beautifully painted frescoes depicting the prowess of the Mogul Empire.

View from Nahargarh Fort in Jaipur, India

View from Nahargarh Fort in Jaipur, India

Located above the city, Nahargarh Fort boasts wonderful views of the cityscape and surrounding hills. Evening proves to be the best time to view the city from Nahargarh Fort as you can see the beautiful city in the day, have a wonderful sunset view from the same and then you can have a look over the city at night. The city looks like a treasure chest with lots of necklaces and diamonds scattered all over it. It also gives an amazing view of the Jal Mahal (better known as the Water Palace). Not to be missed when in Jaipur.

View of the Water Palace from Nahargarh Fort in Jaipur, India
View of the Water Palace as seen from Nahargarh Fort
View from Nahargarh Fort at night
View from Nahargarh Fort at night (taken on cellphone, please pardon the poor quality)

More India Photos & Travel Guides

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