Over the years, I've hit -- and had fun -- at countless party destinations. Don't get me wrong, when you have 51 weeks of work a year and but one week off to go wild, being at a location with an ample supply of bars is pivotal. However sometimes when traveling with the family or in search of beauty and culture, traveling beyond the party is a necessity.

Nowadays so many popular tourist destinations are synonymous with partying, unfortunately. Bali, Indonesia. Cancun, Mexico. Vang Vieng, Laos. Phuket, Thailand. But each one offers so much more. Even though Phuket has a party reputation, that doesn't mean drinking is the only thing to do on the island. Here is the HoliDaze guide on how to escape the Phuket party scene and ensure a refreshing trip.

Step 1. See the right sights.

Pub crawl through Phuket Town? Why, when bars can be found in nearly any city in the world? Opt instead for culture. Go visit a few of the Wats or volunteer at one of the many animal foundations scattered around the island. The Soi Dog Foundation and Gibbon Rehabilitation Project are doing amazing things to improve the situations of animals living on the island, and both have temporary volunteer positions around all year.

Baby elephant outside a small village in Phuket, Thailand
Image by Maegan via Trover

Step 2. Come in. Get lost.

One thing I've learned over the years is that sometimes you just have to ditch the guidebook in order to truly appreciate the unexpected. Motorcycles are ridiculously easy to come by in Phuket and as soon as I did the whole island opened up to me. Just pack a bag for the day and head off into the horizon. You never know where you are going to end up but at least the island isn't so big that you will get lost to the point of needing a search party to retrieve you. You can also take part in one of the locals tours offered.

Step 3. Swim in the water, not amongst crowds of tourists.

Being an island, Phuket has no shortage of beaches. However Phuket also has no shortage of tourists, which means that the most convenient beaches are also the most populated.

Naihan Beach, Phuket, Thailand
Image by Moons via Trover

For the picture-perfect beaches that will give you an iconic shot worthy of using on your Facebook page for years to come, visit my favorite sandy destination in Phuket: Haad Sai Kaew Beach. It is an ideal combination of untouched sand alongside a few small but delicious thatched roof restaurants, one that will you will be dreaming about long after leaving Phuket.

Step 4. Stay at a nice resort.

Sometimes the hassle of planning a busy trip and seeing all the best of a location is too much to be bothered with. Luckily if this should happen to you, rest easy knowing that there is no shortage of magnificent Phuket hotels eager to cater to your every whim. The private resorts contain some of the most spotless beaches on the island. Rather than having to acquire transportation and make the trek up north, it is possible to find a nice resort in town that has a pristine beach.

The swimming pool at Nikki Beach Club, Phuket, Thailand
Image by Munchu via Trover

See More       What Not To Miss In Phuket   Thailand Travel Guides

Published in Thailand

Located in the Gulf of Nicoya, Tortuga Island is actually comprised of two islands with a combined total landmass of only about one square mile. But despite its small size, Isla La Tortuga is one of Costa Rica's most popular tourist destinations and a great day-trip. We went with Calypso Cruises in a group of nearly four dozen, but there was also another similarly-sized group with a different excursion company further down on the island.

Map of the location of Puntarenas and Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

The island is home to a total of 12 residents. They are native Costa Ricans who subsist entirely off renting out beach chairs, jet-skis, snorkels, and other beach- and water-related goods to the flocking tourists. As such you can expect to pay a nice price for everything. They even offer wifi: $15 for 15 minutes. Undoubtedly these islanders make more than the average Costa Rican citizen, but life there is not as perfect as it seems. As one island tico informed me, it is 9 guys and only 3 girls, so "we need more girls...tell more girls to come visit."

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica


The beautiful and nearly unihabited Isla La Tortuga!

The island itself is quite charming. It is comprised of a nice beach area with smooth sand but one end does have a rather a sizable amount of coral chunks and other small rocks mixed in with the sand. There are a couple small wooden structures on the island, one used as a kitchen, another as a bar, and yes of course a final one featuring a pair of restrooms. There is also lots of picnic tables and beach chairs set up in advance, although the beach chairs cost $7-8/hr through the local islanders, not your tour company -- but I'll get back to that shortly. The island is thickly wooded. Supposedly there is a trail you can take that leads through the brush out to a very picturesque area, or so I've been told.

We booked the trip through Calypso Cruises and it just so happens that their office/dock is located literally just a few dozen feet from Pearla del Pacifico, the only hostel/hotel in Puntarenas and hands-down the best hostel in all of Central America!

Calypso Cruises will have an air-conditioned van pick you up early in the morning from a few of the nearby towns -- San Jose, Jaco, Quepos / Manuel Antonio, Monteverde -- and transport you to Puntarenas, where you will be served a traditional Costa Rican breakfast. The CC boat is a two-story 71 ft long catamaran named Manta Raya that is equipped with two giant hammocks stretched between twin hulls and two fresh water pools. The lower deck houses the bar and lounge as well as dual restrooms / changing rooms.

Casting Off...

At precisely 9am the ship leaves port and begins the hour-long trek towards Tortuga Island. Along the way you will pass by local fishing boats out on the hunt, have fantastic views of the western coast of Costa Rica, and maybe even glimpse the occasional family of dolphins that will swim alongside the boat during the final stretch before Tortuga Island. They are fast and can be tricky to photograph though. Along the way you will also be served a light snack (most likely pineapple) and have the option of buying alcoholic beverages at the usual inflated tourist rates.

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Once disembarking the ship, you will have a couple hours to swim and/or sunbath while the staff prepares lunch. The bartender and booze from the ship is unloaded and set up underneath the trees, so after a brief ten minute or so pause, you can resume killing your liver with booze. For those of you who really like to drink, I recommend smuggling in a little liquor of your own. It is very easy to do and turns what easily could be a $200 on alcohol day down to just $40 or $50.

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica


The warthog and I become fast friends

The first group of snorkelers is also taken out shortly after arriving on the island. The remaining people mingle and drink on the beach, swimming and building sand castles (or at least attempting to). Calypso Cruises provides everyone with a very basic two-piece wooden beach chair, but there are also fancy reclining chairs covered in towels and protected from the sun by umbrellas -- those are the ones that cost $7-8/hr and are rented out by the dozen locals that live on the island.

The lunch is served at the picnic tables under the shade of the trees, in the fresh breeze of the ocean. It consists of wine, a ceviche appetizer, salad, vegetables, and bar-b-qued chicken, and will leave you completely satisfied. Be on the lookout for local wildlife that could come wandering by around feeding time, most notably the wild hogs. They are nice critters, surprisingly tame thanks to all the tourists -- you can even pet them! They feel a little strange, more bristly than I would have thought, kind of like a porcupine.

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

After lunch the excursions begin. Included free are snorkeling and the banana boat, but extras like jet-skis are available only upon paying a hefty fee to the islanders. The second snorkeling expedition (provided there is enough demand) sets out after lunch, while meanwhile the banana boat is pulled out and the rides begin.

Finally as the afternoon winds down the catamaran is brought back to the shore and slowly the masses re-assemble on the boat decks. Due to the large group of people combined with the large amounts of alcohol consumed and topped off perfectly by the fact there is only two bathrooms on-board, expect bathroom lines to be in the ten to twenty minute range.

Arriving back at the docks, the fun is over. Usually at this point you would take your air-con van back to your city of origin, be it Jaco or Quepos or whatever, but we recommend instead you just walk a couple dozen feet to the east and spend a couple days at the Pearla del Pacifico (view photos). The whole trip, not counting van rides, lasts about eight hours but is definitely worth it -- if you don't mind being surrounded by tourists all day.

This guy is a bad tourist. Don't be like him.

Case in point: This nameless individual here on the left kept to himself all eight hours. I don't even know why he shelled out $125 for a ticket in the first place! I kid you not, this guy's earplugs never once left his ears! He had them on at the beach, on the boat, even while the band was playing at lunch! Seriously, WTF!?!? People, this is why I started the HoliDaze, this is why I am trying to convince people to open up their eyes and experience the world! It is people like this that confuse and frustrate me, and I'm sorry if that describes you. Get out and live! See and appreciate the world, before its too late.

Here are some more photos from the drunken cruise back to the pier at Puntarenas. And for videos, check out the HoliDaze YouTube page.

  What would you say to the guy listening to his iPod all day instead of enjoying the moment? Share your feedback after the photos.

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Tortuga Island, Costa Rica

Published in Costa Rica

When I told my friend Josh that I had just gotten back from a cruise, he said,

A cruise! I have so many preconceptions of those. Was it filled with old people? Was the food the worst?

Many people I've talked to have the same preconceptions as Josh. And in my experience, these preconceptions of cruising may be based in reality. There were plenty of older adults on our cruise. And my husband described the food as "fancy food, done in a mediocre way." But we didn't take the trip to meet friends, and we found plenty of decent food on the ship, so I can't really complain. (Plus, we are kind of food snobs...there, I admit it.)

Here's why cruising can be a great vacation:

1.   It's easy to get there

Anywhere there's water, there are cruises, so it's relatively easy to get to a cruise ship. If you don't like to fly, you can usually drive to a port. And as a bonus, you can still visit foreign countries without stepping on a plane. Since my husband always flies internationally for work, we didn't want to spend 12 hours flying and then suffer through two days of jet lag. We wanted to spend our vacation relaxing, not getting somewhere.

2.   It's cheap

The price of your cruise includes your room, all food, and most entertainment on board the ship. For us, the cruise cost less than $100 per person per day. We ate steak or fish every night. We saw a comedian and three live dance shows. Someone cleaned our room not once, but twice, every day. Considering the included amenities, it was a steal of a deal. Just be aware that you can also spend a lot once you are on the ship. If you want to gamble, visit the salon, drink alcohol, eat at specialty restaurants or do excursions in port, you will pay extra.

3.   It's stress-free

We have never been on such a stress-free vacation. We didn't need to worry about finding parking, or making dinner reservations, or getting lost because we were on a ship. We could sit by the pool, read in the library, watch a movie in the lounge, exercise in the gym or nap in our room, all of which were extremely relaxing (except the gym part, but we only did that once). In each port, there were dozens of companies ready to ferry us around to go snorkeling, zip-lining, sightseeing, ect. Cruise ships -- and most of the ports they visit -- are financially dependent on your tourism dollars, so they will bend over backwards to make sure you have a wonderful time.

  If you’re interested in booking a cruise, I would recommend searching the big travel websites like expedia and travelocity. You can search by cruise length, departure date, departure port, and cruise line. For great deals, consider booking in the shoulder season (the beginning or end of the tourist season for that region, when weather can be unpredictable and prices are lower). And for destination advice and activities be sure to check out TripAdvisor.

Have any cruising questions, suggestions or stories?

Published in Cruises

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