...it's "Have you eaten already?"

When you travel somewhere, you get to know the culture of the country you're visiting, and its language(s) is a big part of the culture. There are so many more languages and dialects on this world than there are countries, so one shouldn't substitute a country with a culture. A few steps down the road, you may encounter something utterly different.

But every culture and every language has its particularities. There are some amazing facts in etymology and linguistics that allow us to draw connections to culture. Obviously, food and its collective consumption plays an important role in Filipino culture, as in most Asian cultures. This phrase is a good example and a punchline for a basic cultural attitude towards everyday social life. This is why I find it very astonishing, and I hope to find further examples of telling international language facts while travelling. A few more interesting language facts that I have gathered up to now:

  • Karoke means “empty orchestra” in Japanese.
  • Seoul, the South Korean capital, means “the capital” in the Korean language.
  • In English, the name of all the continents end with the same letter that they start with.
  • The etymology of the word “samba”, as Brazilians suggest, is a corruption of the Kikongo word Semba, translated as umbigada in Portuguese, meaning “a blow struck with the belly button.”
  • Eskimoes have hundreds of words for ice but none for hello.
  • The chess phrase “Checkmate” comes from the Persian phrase “Shah Mat,” which means “the king is dead.”
  • The Sanskrit word for “war” can be translated with “desire for more cows.”
  • “Copenhagen” is an old low Danish word meaning “Merchants Harbor”.
  • The Hawaiian alphabet consists of 12 letters and the ʻOkina.
  • The word “voodoo” comes from a West African word that means “spirit” or “diety.” In the etymology of the word, there are no connotations of evil or immorality.
  • In Spain, when there is one bit of food left on the plate that nobody will eat, it is referred to as “la vergüenza”, or “the shame.”
  • Different languages have different filler words; instead of “umm”, “well” or “y’know”, in Japanese language the words “eetto”, “ano”, “sono”, and “ee” are used to fill conversation gaps.

Have any others to share?

Published in Philippines

Backpacking is certainly one of the most authentic ways to see the world. You get to soak up a myriad of experiences, meet new people, eat amazing food, learn different languages, and what’s more, it doesn’t cost you the earth!

If you’re reading this, chances are that you’re already drawn to backpacking. Perhaps you’re apprehensive about backpacking because you’ve never taken the road less traveled before. Indeed, backpacking isn’t all fun and games; there’ll be times when you’ll wonder why you even thought of this. But if you do it right, you’re sure to cherish the experience once you get back home!

Here are some don’ts you should read before you plan your budget backpacking trip:

Don't Do It on Your Own

You can't venture into the wilderness on your own if you've never gone backpacking before. If you have a friend or know someone who is an experienced backpacker, ask him or her if you can join them on their next trip. Knowledgeable company is not only good for your peace of mind but you'll also get to learn a lot if you travel with a seasoned backpacker.

Be sure to travel with a compatible partner; traveling with the wrong person can be a lot worse than traveling alone. Of course, you need to be a good travel companion yourself!

Don’t Test Your Limits

You're new to backpacking and if you don't want to be put off by the whole experience, don't push yourself too hard. Don't be too ambitious about how much ground you'll be able to cover on foot each day and don't imagine that staying away from home for a month will be fine.

If you're backpacking to a new country, a week or two abroad should be manageable, and if you're going to be in the wilderness following trails, take a two-day one-night trip. A shorter trip will also mean you’ll be spending less money!

Backpacking the Incan Trail in Peru
Backpacking the Incan Trail in Peru

Don’t Overfill Your Plate

Remember that quality surpasses quantity when it comes to experiencing the outdoors or other countries. So whilst you keep your trip short, also keep it sweet by planning your itinerary well.

A jam-packed itinerary will mean you’ll be running around trying to see and do as much as possible without really appreciating anything. Plan your itinerary such that you get to smell the roses along the way.

Don’t Over-Plan

Planning is good but over-planning things or following a plan to the T isn’t. You’re going on a trip to have some fun, so don’t shy away from making spontaneous plans.

If you’re on a trail and you find out about a precipice that offers a splendid view, go take in the natural beauty even if it means setting off in another direction. And if you have to postpone leaving a city by a couple of days so you can attend the grand annual fest, just do it!

Making changes to your plans might affect your finances. Simply be prepared for any changes right from the beginning so that you’re not short of cash for unexpected expenses.

Don’t Pick Just Any Destination

If you choose someplace far away, getting to the destination itself will tire you out. As a beginner, select a place that is closer to home so that you can get there easily. Also try to be close to home or civilization so that you don’t feel homesick during the trip.

Backpacking along the beach

Don't Splurge on Backpacking Gear

Firstly, you're on a budget so you can't afford to splurge on backpacking gear. Secondly, this is going to be your first backpacking trip and you don't know if you'll like the experience or not. It won't be wise to spend all your savings on backpacking gear if you may never undertake a backpacking trip again.

That doesn’t mean you buy cheap gear though; if the quality of the gear isn’t good, it might not even make it through your first trip!

The best thing you can do is rent instead of buy backpacking gear. Search for rental shops in your area and you'll get all you need for your backpacking trip without having to spend a fortune.

Don’t Pack Too Much

Your first backpacking trip can be overwhelming and you might want to pack all that you can possibly carry. Don’t give in to the temptation though; you’ll regret it in less than a week.

Realize that you won’t need four pairs of pants and ten shirts while backpacking. You can wear a single pair of pants for the whole trip but if you want some change, just an extra pair will suffice. Pack a minimal number of shirts but a fresh pair of socks and underwear for each day of the trip.

Do pack a formal outfit and a pair of formal shoes too; you never know when you might get invited to a wedding. And if you decide to spend on a lavish dinner, dressing up will make the experience much more enjoyable!

If you must carry lotions, creams, and other items, buy travel size packs or make a habit of snagging the free ones from every hotel you stay at ;)

Do remember to leave space for souvenirs!

Conclusion

Backpacking is a great way to travel on a budget. But it’s important to do it right if you want to have a glitch-free trip! Using the tips given here you’ll definitely be able to have the time of your life. Happy backpacking!

  flickr   //   fortherock   jasonpriem

Published in First Time Backpacking

You Might Be, Depending On Your Answers To These Questions...

But no worries, even if you are addicted to traveling, there is plenty of help out there for you. No, I'm not talking about rehab. That wouldn't work anyway because the tricky thing about a travel addiction is the only cure is the very same thing that is causing the addiction: more traveling.

Yes my friends, there are many of us. Some pride themselves for being backpackers or expert budget travelers, others describe themselves as vagabonds, feel they are suffering from wanderlust or start off lured in by the thought of a simple gap year. Many are finally breaking free after having raised children, with or without their spouse, and still others are mere kids being raised in a nomadic family. Yes, travel is all-encompassing.

However you define yourself the point is you are not alone. And if you know what to look for it becomes very easy to spot the others out there like us.

You might be addicted to traveling if you can answer 'yes' to these statements.

For those keeping score they are worth one point each.

  Do you carry a passport instead of a driver's license?
  Do you frequently wake up and are initially uncertain of exactly what city you are in?
  Do you base everything off of GMT (UTC) just because you are uncertain of your current timezone?
  Does your current "home" have packed bags/luggage laying around, either from your previous/last trip or separate one(s) always ready for spontaneous departures? (Double points if you are a nomad and have no home.)
  Do you talk more to friends in various countries than your old friends from high school?
  Do you believe American "Cheese" has no right at all to be called a cheese?
  Have you ever had to have extra pages stapled to your passport or a new one issued because yours was "just too damn full of stamps"?
  Can you say "Cheers!" in more than five languages? More than ten?

  Do you know more about current foreign policies than what is going on in your own hometown?
  Do the majority of the emails, social media messages, texts and voicemails you receive from family and close friends start with "So where are you now?" or "Are you back in [INSERT COUNTRY HERE] yet?"
  Do you have more than ten travel-related apps on your smartphone?
  When you finally visit home, do people constantly call you outlaugh at you for talking slowly and gesturing with your hands excessively?
  Have foreign words for basic greetings and other simplicities made their way into your verbal vocabulary, even if no one around you knows 100% what you mean?
  Do you believe any sort of 'light' beer has no right being called a beer?
  Would you prefer drinking cow urine over Bud Light? (This question determines both who has visited India and who knows their beer)
  Do the vast majority of your FourSquare points come from "Distance Since Last Check-In: ???? Miles?"
  Have you ever just spontaneously just walked into an airport / bus depot / train station, purchased a ticket for that day, and gotten the hell outta Dodge?
  Do you feel more at home in a different bed every few nights than you do at your actual home?
  Are you proud to say that you no longer watch television because you are too busy living life?
  Do you find sports / entertainment news fleeting or irrelevant, and instead find yourself interested in travel-related or historical/cultural news?
  Can you describe the differences between McDonald's in different countries? (I trust you know this from observation and not participation.)
  Can you name more than 50 countries in under one minute?
  Can you name more than two dozen foreign capital cities in under one minute?
  Do you have any tattoos containing 'RTW' or any other travel-related words or symbols?

  Have you ever corrected and/or argued with a friend over something he saw on the news because you had been there firsthand?
  If you were to write down your grocery list right now, would it contain items that people back home would never have heard of?
  Does you mp3 player or music collection contain types of music from three or more different countries?
  Have you ever been harassed by transportation authorities or customs agents for excessive travel?
  Do you know what lambanog is?
  Do you have any collections of items you have purchased that transcend more than a half-dozen countries? Not counting music, more like shot glasses or wood carvings or unopened bottles of wine, those kind of things.
  Do you have to keep writing new bucket lists just because you keep doing everything on them? (Well then check out my new 2012 bucket list the ultimate Travel Blogger Bucket List TBBL.)
  When someone asks you what's new, do you start naming off countries and/or cities?
  Do you have a membership with MostTraveledPeople.com?
Finally, two bonus questions that are (again, for those keeping score) worth two points each:
  1) Are you in a foreign country right now?
  2) Do you have your passport on your persona or within arms reach?

 

Well, there you go, a grand total of 35 questions with a possibility of getting a top score of 40.

I ended up with 22...

Damn, apparently I'm not as addicted as I thought.

What questions would you add?

  Share your comments and/or scores below!

Published in Miscellany Articles

Countries where antiques, honey, and goatskin are just as illegal as firearms and explosives.

As anyone who has done any foreign traveling will tell you, it is a learning experience like no other -- the world's greatest classroom. After all, how could it not be when this great planet supports an endless amount of cultures, each with their own unique food, languages, customs and beliefs. But occasionally it is not the local sights that make you stop and wonder, but their customs and immigration policies.

Below are some of the most intriguing ones that I've found, but I'm also eager to hear of any that you have noticed in your travels. Be sure to share your comments at the bottom

Water bottles are forbidden

Nigeria   Prohibited items include mineral water, soft drinks, "textile fabrics and mosquito netting."

Barbados & Seychelles   "All bags, clothing, and articles made from camouflage material are expressly forbidden."

Bhutan   "Antiques" are expressly prohibited along with explosives and narcotics.

Oman   Visitors are allowed to bring with them "8 tapes for personal use. However, Customs may confiscate tapes. Tapes will be sent to the Ministry of National Heritage and Culture for verification (takes about 1 week)."

Zimbabwe   Honey is prohibited along with other dangerous items like drugs, firearms, and "flick and lockable blade knives."

New Zealand   Visitors are allowed to bring with them musical instruments "provided that the goods are taken from New Zealand upon their departure."

Malaysia   Importation regulations include "max. 3 pieces of new wearing apparel" and "max. 100 matches." Official policy states that "customs duties of 30% of the value are due in case of exceeding the allowed quantities," although I'm uncertain exactly how they would properly enforce this.

Iceland   "Fishing equipment, including waders and rubber boots must be accompanied by a certificate of disinfection issued by an authorized veterinary officer."

South Korea   The final item on South Korea's list of prohibited items is: "products originating from communist countries."

Cuba   Expressly prohibits "Household appliances (freezers with a capacity exceeding seven cubic feet, air conditioners, any type or model of electric accumulators and heating/cooking plates, electric and microwave ovens, any type or size of electric frying pans, electric water heaters and showers, electric irons and toasters)."

Singapore   Since 1992 chewing gum has been banned in Singapore, although in recent years an addendum has been made to allow for an exception on dental hygiene gum.

Saudi Arabia   "Nothing can be imported free of duty as passenger's baggage, except clothes and strictly personal effects. Customs charges a fee on photographic cameras, typewriters, etc. Customs charges may be refunded if these articles are re-exported within 90 days."

Borat

Jamaica   Expressly prohibits "all articles made of goatskin (still bearing fur), e.g. drums, handbags and rugs."

Kazakhstan   Better leave your copy of Borat at home -- "printed matter directed against Kazakhstan" are completely prohibited.

Israel   The following items are permitted by visitors only if they're "for their personal use and provided re-exported: one video camera, one photo camera, one movie camera, one tape recorder and, up to a value of USD 250. These articles are subject to high deposits which can be paid in cash or by VISA credit card only." However some item categories are completely forbidden, such as all "fruits and vegetables from the African continent."

Hungary   Visitors are forbidden from exporting any "children and baby articles, underware, kitchen articles," among other less-humorous items.

Kenya   High on the banned list here is "imitation firearms, childrens' toy pistols, etc," but this is actually not that surprising if you think about it.

Fiji   "Pilgrims returning to Fiji with holy water should comply with the following requirements. The water must be: limited to one pint; and - carried in hermetically sealed containers from the country of origin; and - certified by a competent authority to be sterile and free from cholera, typhoid, and paratyphoid germs. The water is impounded for 21 days at Nadi airport if this certificate is not available." This actually raises more questions than it answers -- at least for me.

Indonesia   Visitors may only bring (video) cameras, portable radio cassette recorder, binoculars and sport equipment into the country as long as they are also exported upon their departure. However both "cordless telephones" and "Chinese medicines and printings" are expressly forbidden alonside such obvious items as narcotics and firearms.

Iran   "Holding alcoholic beverages and old books or magazines is prohibited."

Cote d'Ivoire   "For personal use only passengers are allowed to import a video camera. The camera must be declared on arrival and a deposit must be paid, which will be returned to the passenger upon departure. Video cassettes are subject to customs duties."

China   Visitors may freely import all vegetables except for egg plants, red peppers, and tomatoes.

Lativia   All "pieces of art older than 50 years must hold permission from Latvian authorities." I can understand limiting the exportation of art, but the importation...huh?

Mmmmm...pork and beer ;)

Lithuania   "Electric fishing equipment" is prohibited unless permits have been obtained from the government.

Maldives   "Alcoholic beverages, pork and pork products are restricted items and are only permitted to be imported with a prior obtained permit. Any such items imported without a permit will be confiscated and destroyed."

Afghanistan   "The import of film cameras is only possible with a licence."

Kuwait   Visitors are not allowed to bring with them any "mineral water."

Mauritius   Prohibited items include "chewing tobacco."

Angola   Visitors are not allowed to bring with them any postal stamps.

Pakistan   "Warning: import of alcoholic beverages is strictly prohibited for both residents and non-residents regardless of their nationality." Emphasis included on official site so this must be of great national concern.

  Quotations from the International Air Transport Association (IATA)

Have you encountered any strange customs or airport regulations?

Maybe you've even gotten lucky sneaking something past? ;)

  Share you comments below, I'm eager to hear your thoughts and experiences with customs.

Published in Miscellany Articles

Thanks to movies like Hostel, I think using hostels when traveling has gotten a bad rep. I can't tell you how many times I have people reference that movie to me when I say that yes, I only stay in hostels while traveling abroad. I personally love staying in hostels! No matter how old I get I will probably never stop using hostels while I travel. I've said it time and again, I'm cheap. I can't stand spending money if I don't have to, which is another reason hostels are a great alternative to pricey hotels when traveling!

Edu Hostel Jogja, the fanciest and cheapest hostel in all of Yogyakarta, Indonesia
This magnificent hostel in Indonesia has a staff of 55 (including two professional chefs) yet costs only $6 USD a night!   See More Photos

Hostels are not only a great way to save money but a fantastic way to meet other travelers. I'm a social butterfly of sorts so any time I get to meet new people, I get a little too excited!

Here's What To Expect When Staying In Hostels

Bunk beds... lots and lots of bunk beds! Unless you're staying in private rooms -- which defeats the f'ing purpose of a hostel -- you can expect huge, well sometimes, rooms packed with bunks. I don't pay extra to stay in private rooms, unless I need the privacy for a night or two, so I mostly stay in the larger dorm rooms since those are always the cheapest ones.

Back Home Hostel in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, has the biggest bunk beds I've ever seen at any hostel in the world
Back Home Hostel in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, one of my favorites!   See More Photos

I've staying in some massive dorms where I felt as if I was the only one in the room, I had tons of space, it wasn't cramped, and there was more than enough room to store all my stuff. Sometime, dorms are smaller but still packed with bunks. This room I stayed in while I was in Rome was one of the smaller dorms where we didn't have a whole lot of room to put our stuff away.

You can expect to meet some stellar travelers just like you! Being someone who is obsessed with traveling, I thoroughly enjoy meeting people from all over the world. I'm always amazed when staying in hostels how I can meet people from every corner of the world but still manage to meet people close to home! At this same hostel in Rome, I met another Gamma Phi from Missouri. It was so cool to meet a fellow sister halfway around the world! I've met people that I'm Facebook friends with and keep in contact with.

First time backpacking? Be prepared to make lots of new friends!
Be prepared to make lots of new friends from around the world

Expect to meet some really awesome staff members that can give you lots of great inside tips for the city that you're in! While I love hitting all the big tourist sights, I also enjoy getting to know the local side of a city! Now, sometimes you may come across a staff member who isn't all that friendly, or one who gives you terrible advice... But 99% of my encounters with hostel staff members have always been positive!

One of my favorite parts of hosteling is the exchange of cultures and experiences you get! When we were in Rome, we finally decided to utilize the kitchen since we were sick of eating out. We went to the grocery store up the street from out hostel and went back to make our dinner. There were a few other people in there making their dinners as well. Once we were all done making it, we went to the dining room to eat, we all decided to share what we had made. One guy was from Slovenia and one was from some other area of Italy. We not only met some really cool people, had fun cooking "together", but then also got to taste some food of theirs from their local areas! You don't get experiences like that staying in hotels!

My first time abroad staying in hostels, I wasn't expecting much. I was thinking I'd get a lumpy bed in a crowded room, and would use it only to sleep and shower. What I got was new friends, really comfortable beds (for the most part), and a great environment to hang out and relax after a long day of sightseeing!

  The best resource for researching and booking your hostels is TripAdvisor. They have millions of reviews from people just like you and I covering literally every hostel in the world, as well as a price comparison tool to instantly find you the lowest price online.

TripAdvisor

Published in First Time Backpacking

So you've decided to hit the road, by yourself – talk about being adventurous and brave!! Congrats! :) Whether this is something daunting or just a walk in the park for you, here are a few thoughts I'd like to share with you...

  1. Have a meal by yourself in a restaurant (before leaving home) – This might not be a big deal to some, however, I've met a couple of women who refuse to sit down in a restaurant and eat alone. Personally, I still have days where it gets difficult to be the only person in the whole restaurant eating by myself – especially during an extended journey and homesickness is setting in. I would look around and every other table is either occupied by a lovey-dovey couple, a group of friends or a family. You will meet new friends as you travel (trust me, you will!) who'd share meals with you but there will always be a meal or two where you have to go it alone and room service isn't an option. So this could be an experiment for you. Take yourself to a nice restaurant tonight. Do not check your smartphone every 5 seconds. Do not plug in your headphones. Do not bring a book / magazine / newspaper. Try to enjoy your meal and the atmosphere of the restaurant. Crack a joke with the wait staff. Surprise yourself.

  2. Familiarize yourself with your camera – Especially if you bought yourself a new one for this upcoming trip. I have done it before and will probably do it again in the future – treat myself to a new camera and not have enough time to learn the functions. Aside from learning how to turn the camera on and off, it's nice to know a few more basic functions. For example the Date/Time setting, I have countless photos taken during the day but the date stamp says ‘pm’ – very silly, really. The camera manufacturers are coming out with very user friendly models, however, sometimes it’s more fun to leave the Automatic setting behind and play around with the other shooting modes. If the User Manual isn't too bulky, take it along on that long haul plane ride.

  3. Be able to read a city map and/or a transit system map – unless you are comfortable with wandering endlessly. These days with many people dependent on their cars and navigation systems, it is not surprising that people are not able to orient themselves with a map. That familiar robotic voice might not be there, suggesting you make a left turn in 500m. I'm not suggesting you need to know how to use a compass...well you should if you are going camping or hiking. It just increases your independence and confidence when you can get yourself from point A to point B with minimal assistance. [N.B. The free maps they hand out in Paris do not show many of the little streets/alleys. So pay attention to street names instead of just keeping count how many street you have crossed – personal experience.]

  4. Upload photos of your family and friends onto your phone OR carry the prints with you – You never know when you need to look at a familiar face to comfort you. They are great for those homesick days. They are also great as conversation starters. Many times on my travels, complete strangers who are locals have approached me to start a conversation – sometimes they are simply curious and friendly, sometimes to practice their English. It is fun and it's safe.

  5. Take a walk in a park or down a quiet street at night – Find your comfort level. You are still in your "backyard" so you know the area but a street can feel completely different at night and empty. To minimize the potential shock to your system of being alone, test your boundaries beforehand. Take along a small flashlight or torch (waterproof if possible) on your trip, it will come in handy, especially if your destination is known for brown outs.

Sometimes a little mental preparation can help make your journey a lot more enjoyable. Bon Voyage!

Published in First Time Backpacking
Do you want to travel the world? And don't know how? Did you know that it's pretty simple actually. When I tell people, who I just met or even some family members, about my trips around the world, they are surprised and ask me if it's not dangerous. "But, what about your job? or your home? You don't have any security..."
There's that word again "security". A reason why a lot of people are afraid to travel around the world. Not knowing where your are going to sleep or eat the next day. You know what? That's what I love about travelling. Never knowing where you might end up, enjoying the most beautiful places in the world and the most awesome people. So you're ready for the next step? DSC01852 This what you have to do:
    1. Figure out where you want to go: Do you already know where you want to go or is it still unknown. It's very important to know what your budget is. For my trip in Asia and Australia (8 months Asia and 4 months Australia) I saved for about one and a half year. So keep in mind how comfortable you want to travel and where do you want to go and try to save up as much as possible. A good travel source is Lonely Planet. Borrow their guides at your local library (or buy them) or take a look at their website. Lonely Planet is pretty much considered the bible for travelers :)
    2. Visa's: Trust me, this is the hard part. Some visa's are really easy to get but others are like nightmares, like in Australia last year, or in Russia or China. Trust me, i've been there! haha, but once you got them you already halfway! If you are doing a around the world trip, it's best to only apply for a visa for the first two countries, but check before how hard and how long it takes to get them.Bay of Islands
    3. Vaccination and other medicine: Two months befor you leave it's important to get the right vaccination for the destination you are going to go. So let your doctor know or go to a special travel clinic to get medicine (like malaria pills) and vaccination.
    4. Flights: Last but not least is booking your flight to your destination. There is no way of knowing when you have to book your flight. Some people do it 3 months before others 6 months before their trip. Take a look at different airlines and I always find Skyscanner a good tool for finding flights. They even use price alerts. That means when your selected route, gets a lower or higher price, you get an email about it.

So how do you prepare for your trip?

Published in Travel Tips

When most people think of traveling one of the first things that comes to their mind is where they are going to stay. Some may hire a travel agent to do the booking for them while others may get online and do the research themselves. Either way, 99% of the time their research will lead them to 5 star resorts offering all-inclusive packages. I'm sure that like me, everyone wishes they could stay at these places. The problem is, for the budget traveler, these resorts are super expensive! Of course you didn't need me to tell you that hahaha. Some people may let these steep prices scare them away from their vacation of a lifetime.

The good news is, there is a much much cheaper option called hostels! Until I started traveling I had never even heard of hostels. The more I researched hostels the more I realized how affordable a vacation, pretty much anywhere in the world, could be. When I say affordable I'm talking about $10-20 per night -- or even as low as $2-3/night in some countries! Yeah you read that right.

Now there are drawbacks such as sharing a room with 3-10 other people (male and female), but thats all part of the experience. Most hostels have shared bathrooms, wifi, and a public kitchen for all the guests (which could be anywhere from 10 to 100 people depending on the hostel and the season). Don't get me wrong, hostels aren't for everyone...but if money is the only thing keeping you from seeing the world hostels are perfect for you!

Here are the top 5 reasons to stay in hostels

01. The people you will meet.   When staying in hostels you will meet people from all over the world doing the same thing you are! It's a great way to practice speaking other languages while also learning more about the planet than you ever did in school. You will quickly realize the similarities and differences between your culture and others. If you are outgoing and open-minded, you will end up with plenty of lifelong Facebook friends from all over the world.

First time backpacking? Be prepared to make lots of new friends!
Be prepared to make lots of new friends from around the world

02. You will eat much healthier (and cheaper!)   As I mentioned before, most hostels have shared kitchens where you can store groceries and cook your meals. During meal times the kitchen can become very busy and congested, but it's fun to watch people from different countries making their favorite foods while you make yours! Again if your friendly and outgoing you can usually trade dishes with your new friends and try some great new authentic foods from around the world!

03. You will learn about the hidden and "non-touristy" things to do in the area.   Most of the people staying in hostels are well traveled individuals that can give you great inside information on things to do in the area you are at, or even their homeland (if you ever make it there). Don't get me wrong, guided tours are great, but with the help of other people at the hostel -- both guests and employees -- you can usually find much better, cheaper options to do with your day. I believe hostels almost force you to get to know the area better because they aren't "all-inclusive." Plus it's always easy to join up with other groups and reduce the cost by splitting it amongst everyone.

04. You can extend the length of your vacation.   To some people this might not matter because they only have that one week of vacation time before they have to return to work. But for those who would like to spend more extended periods of time in an area, hostels are definately the best option. In most countries hostels are pretty common and finding them in different cities along your trip will not be an issue. Of course, sometimes it is hard for me to move on to a new hostel because I do not want to leave all the new friends I have just made!

Edu Hostel Jogja, the fanciest and cheapest hostel in all of Yogyakarta, Indonesia
This magnificent hostel in Indonesia has a staff of 55 (including two professional chefs) yet costs only $6 USD a night!   See More Photos

05. Lets face it, it's all about the $$$$$$$   I tried not putting this item one on here.....but the fact remains that hostel prices cannot be beat. They will save you a fortune while also giving you the most authentic experience you could possibly ask for. Like I said earlier, depending on the season and country, hostels can cost anywhere from $2-20 per night. I don't care if I'm sleeping in a hammock, you simply cannot beat a few dollars to stay two blocks from the beach in Mexico or a 30-second walk from all the fun in Thailand. I'll take it!!

Read More   Hostel Life: What To Expect

I'm sure that there are plenty of other reasons why hostels could be the best option for you, but that's just it.... It's all about you!! Hostels leave your entire trip up to you, not the tour guides that are just trying so hard to get your precious money. Everyone will have their reasons why they love or hate hostels, because after all they are not for everyone. So if you're looking to book your next vacation, make sure to do some research on hostels and give yourself more money to explore wherever you are visiting!

Happy Travels Y'all!!

Published in First Time Backpacking

Birthdays don’t bring out the best in me.

Instead of celebrating being another year wiser, reflecting on a year of great experiences and appreciating being healthy and having great family and friends in my life, I approach birthdays with a sense of insecurity and impending doom.

I can’t help it.

I get depressed about being single (even though I love my independence and would rather be on my own than with the wrong person), I moan about not having children (even though I don’t actually want children), I detest the accounting career that has seen me stuck in a 9-to-5 office job rut for most of the past 17 years (even though it has also paid for a 15 month career break, other travel opportunities and the deposit on my London flat) and I view being another year older as a step closer to my grave and start panicking about not doing everything I want to in life.

Every birthday feels like a mid-life crisis. But this year is going to be different.

I recently reflected on some of the amazing travel adventures I’ve experienced in my “40 Countries, 40 Travel Ideas to Inspire You” article, so the time feels right to start planning some more. As the clock ticks over to an age I’ve been dreading since I turned 37 last year, I’m celebrating it by adding 38 things to my “bucket list” - 38 things I want to do before I die.

  1. Take time out to explore my home, the country I left 12 years ago, on my Great Aussie Road Trip
  2. Find a way to earn a living doing something I am passionate about that doesn't involve the suffocating routine of a 9-to-5 office job
  3. Turn the dream trip of a lifetime into reality and save up for an Antarctica Expedition, sharing the ice with penguins, seals, whales and birdlife (whilst wearing a really warm jacket!)
  4. Head to the opposite pole to search for polar bears in their natural environment
  5. Return to one of my favourite places in the world (Africa) to repeat one of my favourite experiences of all time (wildlife safari) during the annual migration from the Serengeti to an area I didn't see on my last visit to the country (Maasai Mara, Kenya)
  6. Have an article or photograph published
  7. Extend my exploration of South East Asia to one of the few countries in the region I have yet to visit, Indonesia, and enjoy a mojito as the sun is setting on one of its tropical beaches whilst singing Redgum’s “I’ve been to Bali too”
  8. Return to Myanmar, a place that provided one of my most humbling travel experiences of all time, to hopefully learn that the recent change in the political environment has encouraged more travellers to visit the country to create additional income and opportunities for the locals, without leaving the negative aspects of tourism behind when they leave
  9. Explore the temples, shrines and gardens of Kyoto during the cherry blossom season in Japan
  10. Force myself to slow down in an ashram or spiritual retreat in Asia, appreciate simply “being” instead of wondering “what next” and learn to meditate
  11. Get up close and personal with the lemurs and other unique wildlife of Madagascar
  12. Return to Iceland in winter to search for the Northern Lights and revisit my favourite location, Jokulsarlon Glacier Lagoon, to witness the surreal floating ice in a different season
  13. Trek the terraced rice fields of Banaue in the Philippines to assess whether the locals’ description of it being the “eighth wonder of the world” is warranted before heading south to chillax on the beaches
  14. Further explore my spiritual side on a journey through Tibet
  15. Get my hands dirty with some organic farming somewhere in the world with a WWOOF holiday
  16. Take advantage of my recent experience at driving on the ‘wrong’ side of the road and head to Yellowstone (USA) with my camera and hiking boots in search of beers, wolves, bison, moose and other wildlife amidst the waterfalls and geysers of the world’s first national park’s thermal region
  17. Be in a country when they win the football World Cup (and accept that it’s unlikely to be in England)
  18. Contrast my recent experiences in East and Southern Africa with an overland adventure through the Western countries of Ghana, Gambia, Mali, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Senegal, Nigeria, Niger and Togo
  19. Take off my watch, put on my hiking shoes, pick up my camera and lose myself (not literally) in the Canadian Rocky Mountains
  20. Stand opposite Petra (Jordan) in the cave that Karl Pilkington described as the “better piece of real estate” due to its view
  21. Embrace the ‘real’ religion of South America with locals at a football match
  22. Pack my bikini, sunglasses, sunscreen, kindle and party shoes for some Greek Island hopping
  23. Head off the beaten track to explore the geographical diversity of Oman
  24. Treat myself to a spa resort on a Caribbean Island and watch a live cricket match in the West Indies
  25. Sip a glass of Pimms at Wimbledon and go punting in Cambridge, two ‘must do’ things in England that I still haven’t done after living in London for 12 years
  26. Embrace my inner David Attenborough, avoid being eaten by a piranha and attempt to co-exist with blood-sucking leeches in the Amazon
  27. Replace the Ethiopian stereotype placed in my mind by Bob Geldof in the 1980’s with a stereotype created from my own visit to the country
  28. Visit Colombia to discover for myself if the positive backpacker recommendations for this country outweigh its negative media perception
  29. Take what I’ve learned from both positive and negative volunteer and NGO experiences and apply it to more volunteering and international aid support in developing countries
  30. Follow up my first European encounter 13 years ago with a photography-focused European escape, including countries I haven’t yet visited such as Croatia, Romania, Poland, Bulgaria, Slovakia and Slovenia.
  31. Party with the locals in Rio, Brazil
  32. Head to the Galapagos Islands to discover if it’s really true that it’s one of the most incredible wildlife locations on earth
  33. Hike through and photograph some of the most dramatic landscapes in the world at Patagonia in Argentina.
  34. Head south to New Zealand to confirm whether the magical landscapes depicted in Lord of the Rings was reality or just great camera work
  35. Watch re-runs of Northern Exposure and then head to Alaska to see how accurate the depiction of this unique state was
  36. Embrace the cigar, rum, classic car, salsa stereotype of Cuba
  37. Join the Gringo Trail and explore South and Latin America with a flexible itinerary and no deadlines
  38. Leave my accounting career and office job behind to experience a year or two of odd jobs and explore alternate career paths

 

Have you had any of these experiences?

What is on your own bucket list?

Published in Travel Tips

Rishikesh a small town located on the banks of Ganges River is the most sought after destination for white river rafting. The town is very small and is marked by lots of hotels and resorts, though all very basic in nature some will give standards but luxury here is ruled out. Option of camping near the river banks is also possible, only you should have booked it before.

Rishikesh Laxman Bridge
Rishikesh Laxman Bridge

Rishikesh is located near Haridwar and is approx 240 kms from Delhi airport, though the nearest airport is Dehradun, I opted Delhi for the sake of convenience. You can further take a cab/taxi (not self driven) to reach the small town. It is the gateway to the Himalayan range.

Road to Rishikesh
Road to Rishikesh

I have visited Rishikesh twice once in my childhood and once again now in 2011. The place has changed a lot and river rafting has come fast as a good option for adventure lovers. Camping near the river is a great fun that I really enjoyed a lot, in my recent trip. Camping cost would be for $ 20-60 per night per person, I took it for $30 and it was really an amazing experience that could really not be overwritten by my memories of other travel destinations. I will definitely return back when my kid grows up.

View of Ganges River banks and camps
View of Ganges River banks and camps

White river rafting was the main reason why I had opt for this place, it's really an amazing experience. I will say just go and do it rather using words to elobrate the fun and experience you have while doing it.

The town has a wildlife sanctuary nearby (approx 17 kms) it where you can spot animals like leopard etc. The Rajaji wildlife sanctuary is one of the largest park in the Himalayan region.

Meditation is also something one can opt for here. There are various ashrams and temples to do the same. There are many yoga classes taken by group and individual instructor. The pleasing environment of the place makes it a favourite destination among the meditators. I took one and it refreshed me not only mentally but also physically.

Ashrams and Temples along the Ganges River in India
Ashrams and Temples at the river side

For lodging we preferred the government operated hotel which is on the banks of the Ganges river, a nice basic hotel with one of the best locations.

Garden view from our room
Garden view from our room


Getting ready for adventure

  Overall a nice experience and rate it 3.5 on a scale of 5. For more info on India please tweet me @hotelsavi or simply visit us at Hotel Savi Regency.

Published in India
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