Walking to many different landmarks and attractions in a city can be a bit tiring. This is especially true for people who are not in the best of shape. Luckily, there is an easy way for people who are on vacation to enjoy all of the great sights that a city has to offer. A bus tour gives a person a very comfortable way to see many important things in a city. You will also be able to see these things in a very short period of time. This is helpful if your time is limited and you will not be in a certain city for very long. Here are a few of the tips you can use to make your bus tour as enjoyable as it can possibly be:

1. Take your bus tour on a weekday.

A tour bus that is packed with tourists is not the most enjoyable place to see the sights. It is much better to be on a tour bus that has some empty seats that allow you to have some elbow room. You want to avoid a situation where you and the other people are packed into the bus like sardines. One of the easiest things you can do in order to prevent this situation from occurring is to schedule your bus tour on a weekday. Avoid the weekend at all costs. It does not take a genius to figure out that NYC bus tours will be much more packed on the weekend.

2. Get on the bus early.

The location of your seat on the bus will determine how well you are going to be able to see various things during the tour. The people who get on the bus early will obviously take all of the seats that are located by windows. They will also fill up the top deck of the bus. This is why you should always get to the place where your bus tour will depart as early as possible. Being one of the first people to get there will guarantee that you will get one of the best seats on the bus. This will mean that you will be able to take photos that are unobstructed by other people on the bus.

View from the front of the upper deck on a bus in Hong Kong
Unobstructed view from the front of the upper deck on a bus in Hong Kong last month

3. Look at the weather forecast far in advance.

Mother Nature can sometimes wreak havoc on your bus tour plans. Going on a bus tour on a rainy day is bad for several reasons. First of all, you will get soaked if you are sitting on the top deck of the bus. The pictures you take will be dreary and depressing because of the dark skies and the rain obscuring the thing you are taking a picture of. You should only take a tour of a city when it is looking its best. You do not want your memories of the city you went to on vacation to be of bad weather. This is why you should keep tabs on the weather forecast and schedule your bus tour of the city accordingly.

4. Avoid taking a bus tour during rush hour.

Not many people enjoy being stuck in rush hour traffic. Make sure that you book your tour in the middle of the day so that rush hour traffic will not be an issue.

Published in Travel Tips

These days, more and more people are realizing that taking a bike tour is a wonderful way to enjoy the outdoors, spend time with friends, and travel. If you've recently decided that you want to take a bike tour, now is the time to learn how you can make the event absolutely incredible. Use some or all of the information found in this quick reference guide to ensure that your bike tour will be absolutely amazing:

1. Get In Shape.

If you're serious about making your next bike tour a blast, make sure that you get in shape. Huffing and puffing your way through your bike travels can be embarrassing, and it will also prevent you from enjoying the scenery and the organic group conversations that tend to surface during such events. With all of this in mind, make sure that you are getting in all of the exercises necessary to ensure that your body can handle a long-distance ride.

Vietnamese man exercising in the street early one morning
Vietnamese man exercising in the street early one morning. One can only assume he was working those quads so eloquently to get ready for some intense hiking and mountain biking.

The best way to get in shape so you can enjoy your bike trip to the fullest is by doing a combination of cardio, weight-lifting, and stretching. You can typically complete each of these forms of exercise within the gym setting. You may even want to work with a personal trainer as you prepare for the bike travel event. Fitness experts will generally be able to devise a dynamic, customized exercise routine that enables you to build strength and increase cardiovascular endurance.

Bicycling Central Park in New York City
Bicycling around Central Park one day...

2. Find The Perfect Bike Rental Company.

In addition to getting in shape, make sure that you take time to find the perfect bike rental company. This strategy will empower you to ensure that you have the best bike equipment on the block. There are several attributes that you'll want to look for in a rental company. Some of them include:

  • positive online reviews
  • a great Better Business Bureau (BBB) rating
  • industry experience (preferably five years or longer)
  • perks and benefits (discounts, referral programs, etc.)

When you start looking for the ideal company, be sure to keep the professionals of Bike Rental Central Park in mind. These industry experts provide clients with equipment they can use for Central Park bike tours.

Bike tours are great, especially when in beautiful destinations like Hawaii
Bicycling in Hawaii

3. Book Your Flight And Hotel In Advance.

One final technique that can help you enjoy your bike trip to the fullest is booking your flight and hotel in advance. This strategy will empower you to attain competitive rates on your room and plane. Also consider the value of doing a group booking to attain even deeper discounts.

Don't Delay: Start Preparing For Your Bike Tour Today!

If you're ready to go on a bike tour, don't procrastinate. Instead, start preparing now to ensure that you can have an absolutely amazing time. Three preparation strategies that can help you make the most of your event include getting in shape, finding the right bike rental company, and booking your flight and hotel in advance. Implement these strategies now to ensure that your bike tour is incredible!

Published in Travel Inspiration

It seems everybody and their mother has a travel blog nowadays, but the question of how to successfully monetize your travel blog is more common than ever. Sure, because travel blogging is becoming more widely accepted as a legitimate career, but at the same time the influx of new travel bloggers has really made it much more competitive. It's harder to stand out, and even harder to make enough money off your blog to fund your travel lifestyle 100%.

This is how I did it.

Earlier this year I ended my life as a nomad after 2,700 days -- nearly 7-1/2 years -- when I got a condo in Thailand. When I first started traveling, travel blogging was still in its infancy. I was just blogging to blog. Then it became my career. And eventually it led me to a more lucrative career. But we all have to start somewhere.

Affiliate Links & Programs

There are an endless number of affiliate programs and platforms out there, however Amazon Associates is undoutedly the best of them all. Given that Amazon.com and all their international stores (like Amazon.in and Amazon.ca) are already well-known and well-used in countries around the world, people are already used to making online purchases via Amazon. So why not recommend the products you actually use to your readers?

Boxes from Amazon.com

Never endorse anything that you do not use or believe it. Everyone who knows me or reads my writing knows how much I love my a7Rii camera. Sony didn't pay me to say that. They didn't even give me a discount on my camera. But I love the thing, it is amazing, and when I mention this I include the Amazon link. Why not? It's an easy $130 commission each time someone buys one, simple as that.

Vary the price range but focus the products. Don't affiliate link everything. Stick with your niche but find items of vastly different prices within that category. You might see a higher sales conversion rate with lower-priced products, but high-priced products earn impressive commission rates, especially if you are able to more than a half dozen a month.

It's not just Amazon, either. There are platforms like Commission Junction which represents tens of thousands of brands from diverse industries around the world. Test a few out of the period of a few months and see which works best for you.

Up-Sell & Self-Promote

If you have a travel blog, then you are pretty much guaranteed to have an About page. Unfortunately one that people forget is a media/PR page. Something that says "work with me, this is what I can do, this is what I have done, and this is what I will do for you."

It doesn't matter how people found your travel blog, all that matters is why are they there. Obviously there will always be readers, but more and more you find brands, agencies and PR companies searching for blogs that fit a particular niche. Their needs can vary greatly so be sure to put whatever useful abilities you have.

For myself, I would "up-sell" different services over the years as my skills and areas of focus shifted. At first it was web design and freelancing writing. Then I added in photography and SEO services. Next came consultant work and video production. But that was just me. Your services could be anything. You could be a traveling tattoo artist or diving instructor or ESL teacher. Whatever your hobbies, skills or passions are, the only way to find interested clients around the world is to mention this stuff. Of course it helps if you don't just mention this on the "hire me" page but that these same passions form a recurring theme to your blog.

Never put any prices online. This should be a given. If a marketing company from Singapore or London approaches you, you are going to want to charge them more than say a marketing company in India or Vietnam. Your rates should be based on the value that the brand receives, not your expenses. Make sense?

I've turned countless readers into friends and some into clients. Even a couple readers into assistants. It doesn't matter how or why people found your blog so much as the relationship you form with them. So be honest. Just don't be afraid to promote yourself a lit bit either, if you know that you are no one special. (Just know where to stop because no one likes a braggart.)

Write eBooks

The only different between blogs and ebooks is that blogs are free because the content is more scattered. eBooks cost a little bit of money but will cover everything you want to know about a topic -- often times more.

Write a lot about Indonesia? Take your 10 best articles, update and fine-tune them, then put them all together and sell it as an Indonesia eBook.

Bali sunset
Sunset in Bali

Take a lot of stunning photos? Find a common theme, or several themes, and put together an eBook series with the photos, behind-the-scenes information on the photos (how/where it was captured, even technical details) and a few tips for someone wishing to photograph the same place, or mimick the photograph style at a new location.

The only limit is your imagination and creativity.

Create A Store

Nowadays there is no shortage of marketplace software and e-commerce platforms that allow you to create your own store online and begin selling things directly to your web site visitors. This is especially popular with professional photographers, as quality photos can be turned into anything from stationary to apparel or even sold as stock photographs.

Using platforms like Photoshelter or marketplaces like Etsy and Zazzle to create an additional revenue stream without having to do any extra work. Plus there are more new options available every day.

Honestly, monetizing your blog is not about making $1,000 week doing any one thing. It's about having a variety of different income streams so that if something ever stops working, you are still working. Some methods will earn you more than others. Some will work better with you or your brand's personal style and/or needs. And some might end up being a waste of your time. But if you never do any research and never test anything out for yourself, well then you will never learn.

For me travel blogging started as a hobby and then became a career. Now I find myself writing less and producing videos more. But I would never have gotten here without learning how to monetize my blog and fund my nomadic lifestyle.

Published in Travel Inspiration

The very mention of Monaco evokes images of glamorous ladies in evening wear escorted by dashing gentlemen to the tables at one of the many casinos in this small country. Monaco is also known for its Formula One Grand Prix, besides being a popular tax haven for the rich and famous, as well as the rich and not so famous. Glitz, glamour, and the spectacular landscape are all reasons to add the country to your itinerary planner. Here are some not-to-be-missed destinations in this tiny nation that is part of the French Riviera.

Roll the Dice at Monte Carlo Casino and Opera House

Monte Carlo Casino and Opera House
Monte Carlo Casino, Monaco by Paul Wilkinson

A venue for special gala dinners, the Casino and Opera House also houses a marble paved atrium. What catches the eye, though, are the magnificent onyx columns that surround the atrium. With a 130-year-old history under its belt, this building was also the venue of two royal gala dinners. The casino is unique given its stained glass windows, allegorical paintings, bronze lamps, and spectacular decorations. The Casino has also been featured in quite a few notable Hollywood movies including the James Bond series and Ocean's Twelve.

Swim With the Fish at the Oceanographic Museum


Oceanographic Museum, Monaco by wami82

Perched on the Rock of Monaco, this museum of marine sciences is a stunning example of Baroque Revival architecture which by itself is sufficient to ensure it a place on your Monaco travel planner. The museum which towers over the cliff face makes for a picturesque setting. It took 11 years to construct this building which is now home to various several thousand sea creatures including sharks and turtles. The Oceanographic Institute devoted to the study of oceans and their inhabitants are also housed here.

Get a Taste of the Royal Life at Palais du Prince

Palais du Prince, Monaco
Palais du Prince, Monaco by healinglight

The building of the Palace dates back to the 13th century and has its origins as a fortress, but has since been turned into a luxurious palace. There is a gallery with 15th-century frescoes that will leave you awe-struck. The gilded décor of the ‘Blue Room’, the 17th century Palatine Chapel, and the Main Courtyard with its spectacular Carrara marble double staircase make it a ‘must-see’ addition to your Monaco trip planner. Don’t forget to check out the Changing of the Guards ceremony that takes place at about noon each day.

Commune with Nature at the Jardin Exotique de Monaco

Jardin exotique de Monaco
Jardin exotique de Monaco by Sylvain Leprovost

Situated on a steep cliff overlooking the Mediterranean Ocean, this garden is home to varied species of plants from Africa, Arabia, and Latin America. There are at least 7,000 types of succulents which thrive in the great climate the region enjoys. Stalagmites and stalactites are found in the Observatory cave situated on the premises. You can further enrich your knowledge of the pre-historic era and early civilisation with a visit to the Anthropology Museum situated within the property.

Hop on a Catamaran for a Spin around Monaco Harbour

Monaco Harbor
Catamaran rides, Monaco by Dennis Jarvis

The harbour at this princely state is always filled with moored luxury yachts from across the world. It is a great place for a stroll and you can find plenty of places to grab a bite to eat as you watch the spectacular yachts pull out or weigh anchor. Catamaran rides are available for a closer look at the coastline. If you are lucky you might be able to catch a glimpse of the rich and famous arriving to attend one of the many galas or races that take place in Monaco Harbour.

The small size of the country makes it easy to get around and see it all without having to travel too much. Don’t forget to take a close look at the narrow city streets where Formula One drivers race down in May each year!

Published in Monaco

It's no secret that travel is addicting. You cannot take just one trip and then return home without wondering what other spectacular sights, foods and experiences await. Expanding markets like India and China are unleashing more than a hundred million tourists into the foreign travel market a year and still growing steadily. The of rise social media influencers and digital nomads have shown the public that it is possible to travel and have a successful career. That combined with the abundance of professional travel bloggers and vloggers are inspiring a new generation of informed travelers.

Navagio Beach aka Shipwreck Beach in Greece

But once the travel bug bites, what do you do?

Find a way to incorporate work into your travels. In this digital age where so much can be done from a phone or tablet and wifi is never far away, it is easier than ever to work online.

Take amazing photographs?   Consider selling your photos online. You don't even need a portfolio or blog, just join one of the popular stock photography web sites. Alamy and Shutterstock are two of the most popular, both with photographers and customers. Already have a web site? Check out PhotoShelter or SmugMug. In fact here is a great guide on the most profitable places to sell your photos online.

Native English speaker? Bilingual?   English speakers are in demand in a lot of non-English countries. TEFL courses can be taken in person or online, and likewise classes can be held in a physical room or via Skype. Hell some countries don't even care if you have no experience or degree, just that you are a native English speaker. (Like Vietnam!) Professional translation services are also in demand because, let's be honest, Google translate just isn't that reliable.

Already well-traveled or know one location VERY well?   Become a tour guide or travel agent. Several veteran travel bloggers have started their own tour companies. Use your knowledge and eperience to help other people have a rewarding and worry-free trip.

That's what my friends Gunjan and Pranjali did.

Gujan and Pranjali of Tripoetic at Yellowstone National Park in the USA
Gunjan & Pranjali at Yellowstone

After having lived in the United States and traveled around Asia and Europe, Gunjan and Pranjali moved back to India. As more and more Indians are acquiring both the means and the motivation to travel abroad, they soon found themselves using their knowledge to help plan trips for friends and family. Soon they realized their next logical step was to turn this into their career.

Everyone starts off as a tourist and, if they visit enough places, eventually become more traveler than tourist. Travelers learn more, appreciate more and experience more than tourists. That is hands-down the most rewarding way to travel.

The beauty of having an experienced traveler help plan your trip is that they can use their knowledge to ensure that your trip is more of an authentic travel experience, rather than getting caught in an unenjoyable tourist trap. With India's outbound tourism market growing at record numbers, there is no better time for Gunjan and Pranjali to start building toward the future. And thus Tripoetic was born.

Gujan and Pranjali of Tripoetic in Athens, Greece

Using contacts and friendships from their travels around the world, not to mention all their experiences from planning their own journeys, these two travel addicts are now planning trips for all sorts of people with many varied backgrounds. Every trip is custom planned based around your interests, goals, must-see sights, timeframe, budget and of course stomach. (That's right, if you want to make sure you can have your favorite comfort food once every other day, Tripoetic will ensure that an appropriate restaurant is worked into the itinerary.)

Beyond just simply making reservations and handling transportation, Tripoetic takes it one step further by provided extra little services to make your journey smoother. For example, every traveler is also given a daily sightseeing itinerary -- kind of like a miniature guide to everything nearby that might be of interest to you. After all, nothing worse than getting home and learning that you not only missed out on a spectacular site, but that you actually were within minutes of it and didn't even realize.

If you are thinking about heading abroad for the very first time and are a little nervous or only have a short time to pull off a perfect vacation, make sure to get with Gunjan and Pranjali at Tripoetic. They'll handle everything to ensure that you have a wonderful trip.

  Remember: The beauty of travel is that it is a powerful force towards economic uplifting and great tool for putting foreign money directly in the hands of the locals who need it the most -- but only if we avoid the massive international chains and trust in local, family-owned businesses. Travel far, buy local. And always trust in your fellow travelers. Because as Mark Twain famously said, "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness."

Published in India

When you're still new to a career and trying to make a name for yourself on the job, it can be stressful to take vacation time.

Heck, forget traveling for pleasure—even business travel can feel stressful. When you're juggling delayed flights or bad cell service with the desire to make a good impression on your clients and coworkers, travel can feel anything but relaxing.

But take a deep breath, because we've got some good news for you: You can travel the globe and continue to rock out at your job. Here's how four hard-working millennials make it happen.


Jenn Hirsch. Photo credit Brandon Smith

Draw work inspiration from your travels.

As a surf retreat leader and a storyteller through (and founder of) Swell Story, Jenn Hirsch has learned firsthand that her travels can inform her work in big ways.

"My rule has always been to find inspiration from where you travel for whatever venture you have at present," she says. "[My] work is highly creative yet grounded in the present—kind of like traveling to foreign countries and surfing in general."

Communicate with your team before you leave.

Make sure your colleagues and clients have a sense of where you'll be and what your availability will be like before you leave the office.

"Before a trip, I think it is important to meet with your team and third-party partners to make sure all bases are covered," says Nolan Walsh, CEO of Thursday Boot Company.

Let folks know when you'll be out of touch, and also aim to make yourself available at times when they'll be working.

"I usually create a block of 3-5 hours that overlap with my work day back home," says Hirsch. "This is a great tool to find overlapping time when you travel. Share your travel itinerary with your close team members, and let them know when you likely won't be able to take calls. With advance communication, anything is possible."

Use long transit times for work.

Instead of bemoaning the time you spend in transit, put it to productive use.

"You're already stuck in a chair, and you'll feel better getting work done than watching the in-flight movie you never really wanted to see," says Walsh.

  Bonus: Get work done on the plane or train, and you'll have more free time to explore your destination.


Nolan Walsh at home in NYC

Stay charged.

The best hot spots and data plans won't help you get work done if you can't turn your devices on in the first place. Never underestimate the value of keeping your work gadgets fully juiced.

"I'd stress the importance of simply keeping your devices charged," says Charlie Ellis, founder and managing partner of Oxford Consulting Group. "I always travel with two hefty battery packs, a power strip, and a ten-port USB hub."

Embrace free time whenever it arises.

While business travel can take you to all corners of the globe, it can be tough to actually see those places when you're sitting in meetings all day.

The solution? Go exploring whenever down time presents itself, says Hirsch, whether that's during a midday lunch break or at the wee hours of the morning. Especially in major metropolitan areas (think London, Tokyo, or New York), there's something to see no matter when you get a free moment. Don't miss it.


Ricky Joshi (foreground) whitewater rafting in Tennessee

Mix business with pleasure.

I really enjoy visiting places for business where I can add on a couple of extra days to explore an area," says Ricky Joshi, co-founder and CMO of Saatva Mattress. "Los Angeles, Miami, and Chicago are great for this… I [also] really enjoy Central and South America, where I can go on a more adventurous trip. The Caribbean island of St. Kitts and the Portland area of Jamaica are also personal favorites."

It's also smart to plan trips around your personal preferences.

"I've never fully adjusted to New York winters, so in Q1 and Q4 I'll jump at any excuse to take a meeting or contract in Southern California," says Ellis.

You'll improve your mental state and your productivity if you go somewhere that inspires and uplifts you.

Roll with the punches.

It's unavoidable: When you're traveling the world, sometimes things go wrong.

Try discovering that your airline lost your luggage after you've touched down in Bolivia, as Joshi did. "Because I was so "off the grid," it was so difficult finding a place to even try to call them to track it," he says. "I finally gave into my fate and bought essentially a new, very light, wardrobe."

It may not have been ideal, but Joshi made it work. When fate hands you lemons, go find yourself an orange.

  Bonus: Practicing adaptability and efficient problem solving will serve you well on the job.


Charlie Ellis in Montana

Unplug every once in awhile.

It's not a good idea to go MIA without letting clients and coworkers know you'll be off the grid. But everyone—everyone—needs to unplug once in awhile, and that includes you. Do it responsibly by setting clear expectations before your digital detox, setting up an out-of-office email reply, and then committing yourself to not checking your email or phone, says Hirsch. Your mind will thank you for it.

Far from being a hassle, traveling as a millennial—for work or pleasure—doesn't have to be a career killer. Communicate with your team, be open to expanding your horizons, and don't forget to enjoy yourself. After all, there's more to life than work.

  This article was originally published on Hipmunk's Tailwind Blog on April 11th, 2016.

Published in Travel Inspiration

Planning a visit to London? After booking your flight and picking the perfect London hotel, the next item on the list is figuring out where to dine in this British metropolis. London is packed with everything from expensive, swanky restaurants to ultra-affordable, no-frills street vendors. The great thing about this city is that whether you dine in luxury or while just lounging on a park bench, you can enjoy some truly delicious food.

But what should you eat while you're there? You'll be bombarded with international cuisine options and hearty English dishes everywhere you turn. Tantalizing smells will waft from street carts, cafes and restaurants alike, all of which make it more difficult to decide what to eat. But on a limited jaunt in this city, you'll want to make your menu selections carefully. It's important to enjoy the traditional flavors this city serves up without missing out on some of the more exotic offerings.

To help travelers make the most of every meal in London, we've put together this hassle-free guide to the city's best dishes. Use this menu to make sure you don't miss out on the incredible flavors that London has to offer during your visit.

Top foods to try in London infographic

  This article was originally published on IHG on May 9th, 2016.

Published in England

Forget snakes on a plane. Worry about the germs. Research shows that air travelers are at a higher risk for infection than people going about their daily lives.

Just how are illnesses spread on a plane? It comes down to two main factors: Airborne germs that are easily inhaled by people sitting in close quarters, or contact with germ-riddled surfaces on the plane. These factors are exacerbated by the dry conditions typical of airplanes, because viruses prefer low-humidity environments.

The good news is that, for the most part, airplanes' air filtration systems function well enough that you're unlikely to contract more serious illnesses. Instead, your greatest risk is contracting the common cold or a classic case of the flu.

While that's all well and good, it may be little comfort to people who don't particularly want to have a cold or the flu while trying to enjoy their vacation. Luckily, it is possible to decrease your risk of infection from germs on a plane. Here's how to maximize the chances of disembarking the plane as healthy as you boarded it.

Don't travel if you're already sick

If you know that you're suffering from a contagious illness, do your immune system (and your fellow passengers) a favor and don't expose yourself to any more germs by boarding a plane. In particular, the CDC advises that people avoid plane travel if you're more than 36 weeks pregnant, have recently had surgery, have had a recent (serious) injury, or have a fever. In each of these cases, you'll be traveling with a compromised immune system, which increases your risk of catching a contagious infection. Some airlines may be lenient with rescheduling fees if you can prove that you're sick; contact the airline to discuss your options.

Germs suck. Here is how to avoid getting sick on airplanes.

Ask to switch seats

If you find yourself beside someone who's hacking or sniffling, it's okay (really!) to ask a flight attendant if it's possible to switch seats. Even moving just a few rows away can help protect you from a sick person's germs. If there are no other seats on the plane, donning a face mask might help.

Wipe down germy surfaces

Tray tables, armrests, and seat-back pockets are consistently found to be some of thegermiest parts of a plane. Minimize contact with these germs by using wet wipes to disinfect tray tables, armrests, and seat-back pockets and/or using hand sanitizer after touching any of these surfaces.

Wash your hands (a lot)

For the most part, your hands are your body's primary point of contact with germy surfaces. Those germs (including cold and flu viruses) can survive on your skin for hours. The simple fix? Wash your hands frequently with soap and water or (in a pinch) with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.

Keep air vents open.

Circulating air is key to preventing the spread of illness on a plane, so keep the air vent above you open. And don't worry—the air pumping through the vent is filtered and safe to breathe.

Bring your own blanket and pillow

A Wall Street Journal investigation found that airlines tend to wash their blankets and pillows only every 5 to 30 days. (Yes, you read that right.) This means that when you borrow a blanket from the airline, you're sharing a whole lot of germs. Avoid the issue entirely by bringing along your own travel blanket and pillow.

Close the toilet seat before you flush

The spray that accompanies flushing spreads germs throughout the airplane bathroom; closing the lid before you flush will help you avoid contact with these nasty microorganisms. The flusher itself is also a hotbed of germs, so put a paper towel in between your hand and the flusher whenever you flush. And of course, be sure to wash your hands thoroughly after using the loo.

Popping pills sucks. Here is how to avoid getting sick on airplanes.

Stay hydrated

The high elevations and low humidity typical of airplane travel have a dehydrating effect, which can provoke headaches, stomach problems, cramps, and fatigue, and diminish your immune system's ability to fight off infections. The simple solution? Stay hydrated by regularly sipping water before, during, and after your flight. It's also a good idea to avoid alcohol and caffeine, which can contribute to dehydration.

There are a few caveats to this point, however. It's best to avoid drinking the tap water available on airplanes, because airplane tap water has consistently been found to contain levels of bacteria well above U.S. government limits. Opt for bottled water instead. For a similar reason, be sure to ask for drinks sans ice—since many planes refill their ice tanks at foreign airports, the water standards may not be up to par with what you're used to.

Moisturize your nasal membranes

Cabin air tends to dry out our nasal membranes, which are the immune system's main line of defense against incoming germs. Keep your immune system functioning at optimal capacity by using a nasal mist or saline nasal spray during the flight.

While all the immune-boosting strategies in the world can't guarantee your health with absolute certainty, practicing these behaviors on every flight will give you the best chance of making it through a plane ride with your immune system unscathed.

  This post was originally published on Hipmunk's Tailwind Blog on January 22nd, 2016.

Published in Travel Tips

The winter months of December through February — and sometimes through March — are notorious for flight delays due to bad weather. People risk delays during the holidays because they have long periods of mandated time-off and want to spend it with their families. But no one wants to request time off in February only to spend half of the vacation managing flight delays and bad weather.

But while February isn’t the best travel month for every destination, airlines offer some pretty sweet deals on flights during the year’s shortest month. With some trips discounted as much as 79%, travelers should take airlines up on their offers. We analyzed a year’s worth of Hipmunk flight and hotel pricing data, and the following February destinations are worth the bargain.

New York, NY

Whether covered in snow or sunshine, New York is New York — a magical amusement park for both kids and adults. There will never be a shortage of indoor and outdoor winter activities. With flights and a three-night hotel stay averaging $962 in February, the Big Apple offers a steal. Take a horse carriage ride through Central Park as you admire the snow-covered terrain and monuments that make the city so enchanting. Ice skating is available through March at parks including the Wollman Rink in Central Park and Rockefeller Center. If it gets too nippy, be entertained at a Broadway show as you stay warm.

Philadelphia, PA

With 67 National Historic Landmarks, Philly ranks third in the country for most landmarks, including the famous cracked Liberty Bell and the house of poet Edgar Allen Poe. But the city is also a modern metropolis with a striking skyline, impressive street art murals, and rich pop culture. Run up the long steps to the main entrance of the Philadelphia Museum of Art and recreate the famous opening of the cult classic film “Rocky.” Philly has one of the oldest outdoor markets in the U.S. — Italian Market — and also boasts Terminal Market, a great indoor destination. Both sell everything needed to make delicious meals. An average flight and three-night hotel stay in February averaged $819, a savings of up to $80 compared with spring months.

Sunset over the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco, California

San Francisco, CA

Much like San Francisco’s weather stays constant, so do flight and hotel prices, averaging more than a $1,000 most of the year for a flight and a three-night hotel stay. But in late spring, the average was $953, making it the ideal time to head west. SF offers a multitude of varied activities sure to entertain all personalities. Pier 39 alone offers shopping, restaurants, Aquarium of the Bay, and a two-story carousel. But the most endearing attraction is simply observing the quirky sea lions lounge by the pier. In 2015 Walkscore.com gave San Francisco a score of 83.9, making it the second most walkable city in the U.S., Canada, and Australia. Walk or ride the cable cars to get around.

Dublin, Ireland

Flying to Europe from the U.S. in the summer will typically cost around $1,000 or more. But flights to certain European destinations are quite affordable in the coming months. Dublin is small and easy to walk around, ensuring travelers can see and do most of what the city has to offer in a single weekend. Admire the beautiful architecture of the famous St. Patrick’s Cathedral. Walk east for nine minutes to reach St. Stephen’s Green and appreciate the park’s original Victorian layout. Trinity College Dublin, one of Dublin’s most prestigious universities, is only a six minute walk north of the park. The college’s Long Room is eye candy for book nerds.

For the beer and whiskey enthusiasts visit to the Guinness Storehouse brewery or the Jameson whiskey distillery.

Sunset over the Eiffel Tower in Paris, France

Paris, France

Visiting Paris in the springtime is recommended, but it’s so much more affordable in February and March, with some flights ranging between $500 and $600 dollars. Much like New York, there is always plenty to see and do in Paris. Must do outdoor activities include riding to the top of the Eiffel Tower, admiring Notre Dame Cathedral, visiting at least one historical Parisian cemetery. Keep out of the elements at one of Paris’ many museums, the Louvre Museum being one of the most famous for housing Leonardo Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa and the Louvre Pyramid. For modern art lovers, visit the Pompidou Center or the Jeu de Paume.

  This article was posted on Hipmunk's Tailwind blog by The Hipmunk on February 2nd.

Published in Travel Inspiration

If you find that your sleep quality decreases while traveling, you’re not alone. A National Sleep Foundation poll found that most adults prefer the comfort and calm of their own bedrooms over a hotel room—even a luxurious one. And don’t even get people started on the perils of trying to catch some shut-eye on a cheap flight.

Short of bringing their bed with them wherever they go, what’s a weary traveler to do? Whether you’re trying to catch some ZZZs on an airplane, in a hotel, or in a train or car, here’s how to get better sleep while on the road.

how to get better sleep while on the road

1. Get comfortable.

If you’ve ever tried to sleep next to two other people in the backseat of a moving vehicle, you’ll know that this can be easier said than done. But sleep will come faster if you do what you can to make yourself comfortable. Try to wear loose-fitting clothing, take off your shoes, and cuddle up under breathable fabrics for the best chance at decent sleep. If you’re in a plane, train, or car, an inflatable or travel-sized pillow will also help.

2. Keep the environment cool, quiet, and dark.

Studies routinely show that people sleep best in spaces that are quiet, unlit, and cooled to less than 70 degrees Fahrenheit. While you may not be able to control the temperature wherever you’re trying to sleep (except in a car or hotel room), you can keep things quiet by packing earplugs or noise-cancelling headphones or (at hotels) asking for a room that’s located away from the elevator, stairwell, vending machines, and pool (Also don’t forget to hang the “Do Not Disturb” sign on your door). Limit your exposure to light by closing a hotel room’s curtains or packing an eye mask for flights.

3. Stick to your routines.

Consistency is key to getting good sleep, so do what you can to mimic your own bedroom environment wherever you are. Bring along your favorite pair of pajamas, a picture of your family or pet, and any other small items that will help you feel at home. Also be sure to stick to your normal bedtime routines, such as drinking a cup of tea, reading a book, listening to music, or practicing breathing exercises before closing your eyes.

Random hotel room bed waiting for you

4. Avoid stimulants.

Caffeine, alcohol, and exposure to “blue light” (aka the glow emitted from electronic devices like tablets, laptops, and smartphones) can all make it harder to catch some shut-eye. Try not to drink coffee in the afternoon or evening; don’t drink alcohol within a few hours of heading to bed; and turn off all electronics at least an hour before hitting the sheets. Avoiding these stimulants will help your body wind down so you can fall asleep faster.

5. Head to sleep-friendly hotels.

Reading reviews of hotels online prior to booking will help alert you to whether a hotel is known for having raucous guests or promoting quality slumber. Some hotels have even started investing in amenities to help guests get better sleep.

For example, the Lorien Hotel & Spa in Alexandria, Va. offers guests a “Dream Menu,” or a collection of services and products designed to help guests get better sleep (think hot water bottles, Snore-no-More pillows, and a Bed Wedge that elevates your upper torso). At the Fairmont San Francisco, guests can take advantage of a sleep kit complete with sleep machine, earplugs, eye mask, and slippers. Crowne Plaza hotels offer a “Sleep Advantage” program that lets guests elect to stay in quiet zones sans room attendant, housekeeping, or engineering activities from 9 p.m. to 10 a.m. Sunday through Thursday. And Hampton hotels offer a “Clean and Fresh Bed” designed to provide guests with optimum comfort in the form of streamlined covers, four pillows per bed, and high-thread-count sheets.

Most importantly? Even if you find yourself tossing and turning, don’t lose hope. Fretting over lost sleep will only make you anxious, so try not to stress too much if you wanted to snooze through an entire eight-hour flight and only managed to catch an hour or two of ZZZs. A little bit of sleep is better than none. And if all else fails, never forget the power of a cat nap.

  This article was posted on Hipmunk's Tailwind blog by The Hipmunk on November 15th.

Published in Travel Tips
Page 1 of 4
4x4 48 Hours abandoned accommodations activities adult adventure Agra airlines airports air travel Alabama Alaska Alberta alcohol Alps Amsterdam Anaheim Andalusia Andhra Pradesh Angkor Wat Ankara Antarctica Antipolo City app archaeology architecture Arctic Arizona Arkansas art Asheville Athens Atlanta Auckland Austin backpacking Bacolod City Bali Bangkok Barcelona bars beach beaches beer Berlin Big Island biking Birmingham boat Bologna books border Boston brewery British Columbia Bucharest bucket list Buddhist budget Bunol bus Cairo California camping Cancun Cape Town Carlsbad castle cathedral caves cemetery Charlotte Chennai Chicago Chihuahua Chitwan city life clubs Colorado Colorado Springs Columbia Connecticut cooking Coron Corpus Christi couchsurfing cruise cultural tourism culture culture shock Cusco Dar es Salaam Davao City day trip Delaware Delhi Denver desert distillery diving Dubai Dublin Ebisu El Paso ESL family travel fashion female travel ferry festivals first class first impressions first time fishing Flagstaff flights Florence Florida food foodie food porn fort Frankfort free fruit Galapagos garden Georgia Gili Islands glamping Glasgow Goa Grand Canyon Great Barrier Reef group travel Guangdong Gujarat Hanoi Harajuku haunted Havana Hawaii health hidden hiking Himachal Pradesh Himalayas history Ho Chi Minh HoliDaze Guide Hollywood Honolulu hostel hotel Houston how to Iberia ice ice hotel Illinois immigration Indiana Indianapolis Infanta inspiration interview island Istanbul Jaipur Jaisalmer Jakarta Java Jodhpur Juarez jungle Kalamata Kansas Kashmir kayaking Kentucky Kerala kids know before you go Knoxville Ko Samui Krakow Kuala Lumpur Kyoto Ladakh La Fortuna Laguna lake languages Las Vegas legal illegal legend Leh Lexington LGBT Liliw Lima Limerick liquor Lisbon local life locals Lombok London long term travel Los Angeles Louisiana Louisville Lucerne luggage Lunag Prabang Luxor luxury Luzon Machu Picchu Madeira Madrid Maine Malacca Malaga Manali Manhattan Manila Manipur Marina del Rey market Maryland Massachusetts mausoleum Medellin Meghalaya Melbourne Memphis Mexico City Miami Mindanao Minnesota Mississippi Mombasa Montana Montego Bay Monterey Monteverde Montreal Moscow mosque motivation motorcycle mountains Mumbai Munich Muscat museums music Mycenae mystery myths Nairobi Napa Nashville national park nature networking Nevada New Mexico news New York New York City Nha Trang nightlife North Carolina Northern Lights Oahu ocean offbeat off roading off the beaten path Ohio Oklahoma Olongapo Ontario Oregon Orlando Osaka Oslo ossuary outdoors overlanding packing palaces Palawan Palm Springs Pamukkale Paris park party Peloponnese Pennsylvania people watching pet friendly Philadelphia Phi Phi photo gallery photography photos Phuket Pike's Peak Pokhara Portland Prague prostitution Puerto Galera Punta Cana Puntarenas Pylos Pyongyang Quebec Queensland Queenstown Quezon quirky Quito quiz race rafting railway rainforest Rajasthan Raleigh rant relaxing religion Reno Requena resort responsible travel restaurant review Reykjavik Rhode Island Rickshaw Run Rio de Janeiro Rishikesh river road trip roman romance Rome Roppongi Roswell RTW safari Salt Lake City San Diego San Francisco San Jose San Juan Santa Cruz Santa Fe Santiago Santo Domingo Savannah scenery seafood Seattle Sedona Seville Shibuya Shinjuku shipwreck shopping Siem Reap skiing snorkeling snow social media solo travel songkran Sonoma South Carolina South Padre Island souvenirs spa spiritual Spiti Valley sports Stockholm strange food Stratford street art street food student travel Subic Bay submarine subway Sulawesi Sumatra summer Surabaya surfing swimming Sydney Tagaytay City Taipei Tallinn Tamil Nadu TBBL tea technology TEFL temple Tenerife Tennessee Texas theme park thoughtprovoking Tibet Tijuana toilets Tokyo Tomatina Top 5 Top 10 Toronto tourist trap traditional train travel transportation travel advice travel hacking travel ideas travel inspiration travel motivation travel news travel planning travel safety travel tips trekking Tromso tuktuk Tulsa Ubud UDAIPUR Ulaanbaatar Unawatuna UNESCO unique Utah Uttarakhand Val d'Isere Valencia Vancouver Varkala vegetarian Venice Vermont video Vienna Virginia visa Visayas volcano volunteer Washington water waterfall water sports wedding weird West Bank wildlife wine winter working abroad world's largest Yogyakarta Yoyogi Yunnan Zakynthos ziplining Zurich

Login to The HoliDaze to submit articles and comments or register your blog.