First century Roman mausoleums under Saint Peter’s Basilica

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In my first article in this series I covered the generalities and historic background of the Vatican Necropolis. (Go back and read itif you haven't, I'll wait.) In this second post I'll cover the mausoleums in the underground tour under Saint Peter's Basilica, one by one with the its highlights. I hope this compendium will bring us closer to the people who built these tombs, the care they poured into these family spaces commissioning the decoration and the architecture, the dedication and the sentiment in making these the best place possible for their dead.

Interior of Mausoleum E, Vatican Necropolis. Photo: Fabbrica of Saint Peter’s.

And ultimately, let us go back in time in a walk up the Vatican Hill, to finally reach the tomb of Saint Peter, Jesus' right hand man.

The Mausoleums

According to the Open University’s course about ancient Roman funerary monuments family was important for the ancient Romans. One way to preserve the name of the family was to build a family tomb. Though most Romans could not afford one, many built them for their nuclear family of husband, wife and children. Poor Romans would be buried in mass graves or small tombs marked on the ground with modest markers o amphorae.

Modest markers of tombs at the Diocletian Baths, Rome
Modest markers of tombs at the Diocletian Baths, Rome

The size, extent of decoration and inclusion of architectural elements had a direct relation to the social status of the family. During the first century AD the deceased were cremated and their remains put into containers or urns that were placed in small niches (columbarium) inside the family tomb I will be using a Vatican Necropolis floorplan along the way, so that you know exactly where you are. Here we go!

Mausoleum A

Vatican Necropolis Mausoleum A

This is where the tour starts. The mausoleum of Caius Polilius Heracla contains a tablet in which the existence of the nearby arena (Nero’s circus) is mentioned. Tablet from Mausoleum A. From 'The Tomb of St. Peter' by Margherita Guarducci, Hawthorn. 1960

Tablet from Mausoleum A. From 'The Tomb of St. Peter' by Margherita Guarducci, Hawthorn. 1960
Tablet from Mausoleum A. From 'The Tomb of St. Peter' by Margherita Guarducci, Hawthorn. 1960

Mausoleum B

Vatican Necropolis Musoleum B map

It belonged to Fannia Redempta, the wife of Aurelius Hermes, a freeman of the Augusti family who highlights his wife as "incomparable." The walls have niches where the ashes were stored in urns, which indicate a pagan (different from the main religions of the world) burial. The painting on the vault is of a "Sun Chariot" accompanied by figures of the seasons. The rest of the tomb is decorated with paintings of flowers and animals.

Interior of mausoleum B, Vatican Necropolis
Interior of mausoleum B. Photo: saintpetersbasilica.org

Mausoleum C

Vatican Necropolis Mausoleum C map

This is the tomb of L. Tullius Zethus. The L preceding the name implies he was a freed slave or his father had been. He must’ve done pretty well for himself since this tomb is one of the most ornate with wall decorations and mosaic floor. Two marble urns were added at a later period. The tomb has niches for urns and two arcosolia (a recess on the wall in the form of an arc, used as grave).

Entrance to Mausoleum C, Vatican Necropolis
Entrance to Mausoleum C. Photo: Fabbrica of Saint Peter’s.

Interior of mausoleum C, Vatican Necropolis
Interior of mausoleum C. Photo: Fabbrica of Saint Peter’s.

Detail of the mosaic floor in mausoleum C, Vatican Necropoliis
Detail of the mosaic floor in mausoleum C, Vatican Necropoliis. Photo: Fabbrica of Saint Peter’s.

Mausoleum D

Vatican Necropolis Mausoleum D map

We don’t know who it belonged to. It’s called Mausoleum of the opus reticulatum, named after the pattern in which the bricks have been placed.

Interior of mausoleum D, Vatican Necropolis
Interior of mausoleum D. Photo: Fabbrica of Saint Peter’s.

A street in the Vatican Necropolis
A street in the Vatican Necropolis. Photo: Catholic Eye Candy http://cathcandy.wordpress.com

Mausoleum E

Vatican Necropolis Mausoleum E map

This is the tomb of T. Aelius Tyrannus, a freedman who worked in public office. The most notable elements of this tomb are two alabaster containers, one with a Medusa carving and the stucco paintings on the walls.

As with other tombs there are niches and arcosolia… but observe also the staircase that was used to go up to and down from the upper room which was used for the “refrigerio” a rite in which family accompanied the deceased in a sort of feast. The family go down to the inner burial room to pour libations (offerings of food and wine) through holes on the floor, to feed the deceased.

Detail of Mausoleum E, Vatican Necropolis
Detail of Mausoleum E, Vatican Necropolis. Photo: www.vatican.va

Detail of Mausoleum E, Vatican Necropolis
Detail of Mausoleum E, Vatican Necropolis. Photo: www.vatican.va

Detail of a parrot in Mausoleum E, Vatican Necropolis
Detail of a parrot in Mausoleum E, Vatican Necropolis. Photo: www.vatican.va

Interior of Mausoleum E with alabaster containers, Vatican Necropolis
Interior of Mausoleum E with alabaster containers. Photo: Blanca & Ian's Travels

Mausoleum F

Vatican Necropolis Mausoleum F map

The first to be discovered in 1939, this is the tomb of the Tulli and the Caetenni as it is stated on the altar that stands in the middle of the mausoleum. This is a pagan tomb with some Christian symbolism. The woman mentioned in the altar is Emilia Gorgonia, and her husband mentions her beauty and goodness. The holes for the libations are visible on the right side of the floor. Romans held funeral banquets in which wine and food were poured inside these holes, for the deceased to be fed.

Interior of Mausoleum F, Vatican Necropolis
Interior of Mausoleum F, Vatican Necropolis. Photo: BBC. Vatican: The Hidden World.

Detail of sheep and bull on the left wall of Mausoleum F, Vatican Necropolis
Detail of sheep and bull on the left wall of Mausoleum F, Vatican Necropolis. Photo: www.vatican.va

Holes for the libations on the mosaic floor of Mausoleum F, Vatican Necropolis
Holes for the libations on the mosaic floor of Mausoleum F, Vatican Necropolis. Photo: www.vatican.va

Interior of Mausoleum F, Vatican Necropolis
Interior of Mausoleum F, Vatican Necropolis. Photo: www.vatican.va

Mausoleum G

Vatican Necropolis Mausoleum G map

The Tomb of the Teacher is named after the painting in the back wall depicting an old man with a scroll, in front of a younger man. It is most likely an administrator and a servant, though the first people who saw the tomb interpreted the painting as a teaching and his student. The ceiling depicts beautiful paintings of animals, garlands and geometric figures. Can you imagine the artist painting these figures with so much care and attention?

Interior of Mausoleum G, Vatican Necropolis
Interior of Mausoleum G, Vatican Necropolis. Photo: Fabbrica of Saint Peter’s.

Mausoleum H

Vvatican Necropolis Mausoleum H map

The Tomb of the Valerii is the most luxurious of all the tombs. It belonged to Valerius Philumenus and Valeria Galatia who gave permission to several members of their family and some friends, to use this mausoleum. Several marble portraits (including some children) were found in it. See a couple of them on the bottom-right corner of this picture?

Interior of Mausoleum H, Vatican Necropolis
Interior of Mausoleum H, Vatican Necropolis. Photo: www.vatican.va

Interior of Mausoleum H, Vatican Necropolis
Interior of Mausoleum H, Vatican Necropolis. Photo: www.vatican.va

Mausoleum I

Vatican NecropolisM ausoleum I map

The Tomb of the Chariot from the quadriga figre in the mosaic floor that depicts the rape of Persephone by Pluto on a chariot driven by Mercury. The fresco paintings depict birds, a peacock (a symbol of afterlife), ducks, doves and floral designs.

Interior of Mausoleum I, Vatican Necropolis
Interior of Mausoleum I, Vatican Necropolis. Photo: www.vatican.va

Detail of the Chariot mosaic on the floor, Vatican Necropolis
Detail of the Chariot mosaic on the floor. Photo: Blanca & Ian's Travels, http://members.rennlist.com/imcarthur/roma.htm

Detail of the peacock, Vatican Necropolis
Detail of the peacock, Vatican Necropolis. Photo: www.vatican.va

Mausoleum M

Vatican Necropolis Mausoleum M map

The tomb of the Julii or "Cristo Sole", Christ the Sun or the Christan Mausoleum. This tomb was built by the parents of Julius Tarpeianus. Even though the shape and some elements of the tomb are pagan, the mosaics are Christians depicting a scene of Jonah being eaten by the whale and a scene of a fisherman.

The Cristo Sole, Vatican Necropolis
The Cristo Sole, Vatican Necropolis. Photo: http://counterlightsrantsandblather1.blogspot.com

Detail of the fisherman, Vatican Necropolis
Detail of the fisherman, Vatican Necropolis. Photo: http://sacredportals.blogspot.com

Detail of Jonah. Vatican Necropolis
Detail of Jonah. Vatican Necropolis. Photo: Fabbrica of Saint Peter’s

Mausoleum N

Vatican Necropolis Mausoleum N location

The tomb of Aebutius also bears the name of "Clodius Romanus". His mother calls him her "most gentle son" on the epitaph of the urn.

Entrance to Mausoleum N, Vatican Necropolis
Entrance to Mausoleum N, Vatican Necropolis. Photo: www.vatican.va

Interior of Mausoleum N, Vatican Necropolis
Interior of Mausoleum N, Vatican Necropolis. Photo: Fabbrica of Saint Peter’s

Mausoleum U

Vatican Necropolis Mausoleum U location

A reduced tomb, you can only see a small detail of a painted “light-bearer”.

Detail of interior of Mausoleum U, Vatican Necropolis
Detail of interior of Mausoleum U, Vatican Necropolis. Photo: www.vatican.va

Mausoleum T

Vatican Necropolis Mausoleum T location

The Tomb of Trebellena Flaccilla is decorated with delicate painting of birds and flowers. There’s also a detail of a dolphin.

Interior of Mausoleum T, Vatican Necropolis
Interior of Mausoleum T, Vatican Necropolis. Photo: Fabbrica of Saint Peter’s

Mausoleum S

Vaticanv Necropolis Mausoleum S location

This tomb has been largely occupied by the foundations to Bernini’s Baldaquino (the canopy above). Mausoleum S is very important because it’s located on the south of Field P and beyond it, there’s a small corridor called the “Clivus” that runs from south to north meeting the “Red Wall” at the northeast side. You need to remember these three terms for the next post, because here, we are entering the Tomb of Saint Peter itself. But for that, we need an even more thorough explanation.

We're almost there!

By now we have walked up the slope of the Vatican Hill, south to north, going through the remains of a cemetery for wealthy Romans. We have imagined how they remembered their dead and how they celebrated life with their rituals and the ornate decorations that cemented their family tomb. Have you ever visited other Roman cemeteries? What was the experience like? How do they relate to the way we see death now and our own rituals?

  Share your thoughts in the comments field below!

Practicalities

  • Make reservations well in advance, between 30 to 90 days before due to reduced availability.
  • Send an email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • They’ll respond asking for your full name (and those in your party), nationalities, home address and number, age and language you prefer for the tour.
  • You are not allowed to make reservations for other people (unless they are your party and you’re going with them to the tour).
  • Entrance fee is about 12 Euro and you are asked to pay them via credit card before making your reservation.
  • No cameras, food or big bags allowed. There are places where you can store them on the sides of Saint Peter’s Square.
  • A very strict dress code is enforced. No bare shoulders, no skirts above the knee and no shorts, the Necropolis is considered a holy place.
  • The Scavi is open from 9:15 to 3:30 pm Mon-Sat except on Vatican holidays.
  • The tour lasts about 60-90 minutes and it is completely underground.
  • On the appointment date approach the Swiss Guards on the left side of Saint Peter’s Square. They’ll direct you to the Ufficio Scavi (Excavation Office).
  • Be there at least 10 minutes before the hour in your confirmation email, to receive your tickets.
  • People under 15 are not allowed. No more than 12 people per group.
  • People who pay for the tour of the Vatican Necropolis, can enter Saint Peter’s Basilica right afterwards without having to get in line!
Carolina Ayerbe

Carolina is kind of a nerd, interested in history, art, science and entertainment and how travel is interwoven with all of them. For Carolina, travel is a reponsibility in the sense that when we travel, we become better people and we bring new knowledge to our own communities, we become multipliers of tolerance and compassion.

Website: www.culturaltravelguide.com/

Comments  

0 # Derek Freal 2012-07-04 08:44
WOW...That is a wealth of information!
Now I cannot wait to visit Saint Peter's Basilica!
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